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It's not too late for privacy

Have you heard the news? "Privacy is dead!"

The message is urgent. It's often shouted in prominent headlines, with an implied challenge. The new masters of the digital universe urge the masses: C'mon, get with the program! Innovate! Don't be so precious! Don't you grok that Information Wants To Be Free? Old fashioned privacy is holding us back!

The stark choice posited between privacy and digital liberation is rarely examined with much intellectual rigor. Often, "privacy is dead" is just a tired fatalistic response to the latest breach or eye-popping digital development, like facial recognition, or a smartphone's location monitoring. In fact, those who earnestly assert that privacy is over are almost always trying to sell us something, be it sneakers, or a political ideology, or a wanton digital business model.

Is it really too late for privacy? Is the "genie out of the bottle"? Even if we accepted the ridiculous premise that privacy is at odds with progress, no it's not too late, for a couple of reasons. Firstly, the pessimism (or barely disguised commercial opportunism) generally confuses secrecy for privacy. And secondly, frankly, we aint seen nothin yet!

Conflating privacy and secrecy

Technology certainly has laid us bare. Behavioral modeling, facial recognition, Big Data mining, natural language processing and so on have given corporations X-Ray vision into our digital lives. While exhibitionism has been cultivated and normalised by the informopolists, even the most guarded social network users may be defiled by data prospectors who, without consent, upload their contact lists, pore over their photo albums, and mine their shopping histories.

So yes, a great deal about us has leaked out into what some see as an infinitely extended neo-public domain. And yet we can be public and retain our privacy at the same time. Just as we have for centuries of civilised life.

It's true that privacy is a slippery concept. The leading privacy scholar Daniel Solove once observed that "Privacy is a concept in disarray. Nobody can articulate what it means."

Some people seem defeated by privacy's definitional difficulties, yet information privacy is simply framed, and corresponding data protection laws are elegant and readily understood.

Information privacy is basically a state where those who know us are restrained in they do with the knowledge they have about us. Privacy is about respect, and protecting individuals against exploitation. It is not about secrecy or even anonymity. There are few cases where ordinary people really want to be anonymous. We actually want businesses to know - within limits - who we are, where we are, what we've done and what we like ... but we want them to respect what they know, to not share it with others, and to not take advantage of it in unexpected ways. Privacy means that organisations behave as though it's a privilege to know us. Privacy can involve businesses and governments giving up a little bit of power.

Many have come to see privacy as literally a battleground. The grassroots Cryptoparty movement came together around the heady belief that privacy means hiding from the establishment. Cryptoparties teach participants how to use Tor and PGP, and they spread a message of resistance. They take inspiration from the Arab Spring where encryption has of course been vital for the security of protestors and organisers. One Cryptoparty I attended in Sydney opened with tributes from Anonymous, and a number of recorded talks by activists who ranged across a spectrum of political issues like censorship, copyright, national security and Occupy.

I appreciate where they're coming from, for the establishment has always overplayed its security hand, and run roughshod over privacy. Even traditionally moderate Western countries have governments charging like china shop bulls into web filtering and ISP data retention, all in the name of a poorly characterised terrorist threat. When governments show little sympathy for netizenship, and absolutely no understanding of how the web works, it's unsurprising that sections of society take up digital arms in response.

Yet going underground with encryption is a limited privacy stratagem, because do-it-yourself encryption is incompatible with the majority of our digital dealings. The most nefarious and least controlled privacy offences are committed not by government but by Internet companies, large and small. To engage fairly and squarely with businesses, consumers need privacy protections, comparable to the safeguards against unscrupulous merchants we enjoy, uncontroversially, in traditional commerce. There should be reasonable limitations on how our Personally Identifiable Information (PII) is used by all the services we deal with. We need department stores to refrain from extracting health information from our shopping habits, merchants to not use our credit card numbers as customer reference numbers, shopping malls to not track patrons by their mobile phones, and online social networks to not x-ray our photo albums by biometric face recognition.

Encrypting everything we do would only put it beyond reach of the companies we obviously want to deal with. Look for instance at how the cryptoparties are organised. Some cryptoparties manage their bookings via the US event organiser Eventbrite to which attendants have to send a few personal details. So ironically, when registering for a cryptoparty, you can not use encryption!

The central issue is this: going out in public does not neutralise privacy. It never did in the physical world and it shouldn't be the case in cyberspace either. Modern society has long rested on balanced consumer protection regulations to curb the occasional excesses of business and government. Therefore we ought not to respond to online privacy invasions as if the digital economy is a new Wild West. We should not have to hide away if privacy is agreed to mean respecting the PII of customers, users and citizens, and restraining what data custodians do with that precious resource.

Data Mining and Data Refining

We're still in the early days of the social web, and the information innovation has really only just begun. There is incredible value to be extracted from mining the underground rivers of data coursing unseen through cyberspace, and refining that raw material into Personal Information.

Look at what the data prospectors and processors have managed to do already.


  • Facial recognition transforms vast stores of anonymous photos into PII, without consent, and without limitation. Facebook's deployment of biometric technology was covert and especially clever. For years they encouraged users to tag people they knew in photos. It seemed innocent enough but through these fun and games, Facebook was crowd-sourcing the facial recognition templates and calibrating their constantly evolving algorithms, without ever mentioning biometrics in their privacy policy or help pages. Even now Facebook's Data Use Policy is entirely silent on biometric templates and what they allow themselves to do with them.

    It's difficult to overstate the value of facial recognition to businesses like Facebook when they have just one asset: knowledge about their members and users. Combined with image analysis and content addressable graphical memory, facial recognition lets social media companies work out what we're doing, when, where and with whom. I call it piracy. Billions of everyday images have been uploaded over many years by users for ostensiby personal purposes, without any clue that technology would energe to convert those pictures into a commercial resource.

    Third party services like Facedeals are starting to emerge, using Facebook's photo resources for commercial facial recognition in public. And the most recent facial recognition entrepreneurs like Name Tag App boast of scraping images from any "public" photo databases they can find. But as we shall see below, in many parts of the world there are restrictions on leveraging public-facing databases, because there is a legal difference between anonymous data and identified information.

  • Some of the richest stores of raw customer data are aggregated in retailer databases. The UK department store Tesco for example is said to hold more data about British citizens than the government does. For years of course data analysts have combed through shopping history for marketing insights, but their predictive powers are growing rapidly. An infamous example is Target's covert development of methods to identify customers who are pregnant based on their buying habits. Some Big Data practitioners seem so enamoured with their ability to extract secrets from apparently mundane data, they overlook that PII collected indirectly by algorithm is subject to privacy law just as if it was collected directly by questionnaire. Retailers need to remember this as they prepare to exploit their massive loyalty databases into new financial services ventures.
  • Natural Language Processing (NLP) is the secret sauce in Apple's Siri, allowing her to take commands and dictation. Every time you dictate an email or a text message to Siri, Apple gets hold of telecommunications contet that is normally out of bounds to the phone companies. Siri is like a free PA that reports your daily activities back to the secretarial agency. There is no mention at all of Siri in Apple's Privacy Policy despite the limitless collection of intimate personal information.
  • And looking ahead, Google Glass in the privacy stakes will probably surpass both Siri and facial recognition. If actions speak louder than words, imagine the value to Google of seeing through Glass exactly what we do in real time. Digital companies wanting to know our minds won't need us to expressly "like" anything anymore; they'll be able to tell our preferences from our unexpurgated behaviours.

The surprising power of data protection regulations

There's a widespread belief that technology has outstripped privacy law, yet it turns out technology neutral data privacy law copes well with most digital developments. OECD privacy principles (enacted in over 100 countries) and the US FIPPs (Fair Information Practice Principles) require that companies be transarent about what PII they collect and why, limit the ways in which PII is used for unrelated purposes.

Privacy advocates can take heart from several cases where existing privacy regulations have proven effective against some of the informopolies' trespasses. And technologists and cynics who think privacy is hopeless should heed the lessons.


  • Google StreetView cars, while they drive up and down photographing the world, also collect Wi-Fi hub coordinates for use in geo-location services. In 2010 it was discovered that the StreetView software was also collecting unencrypted Wi-Fi network traffic, some of which contained Personal Information like user names and even passwords. Privacy Commissioners in Australia, Japan, Korea, the Netherlands and elsewhere found Google was in breach of their data protection laws. Google explained that the collection was inadverrtant, apologized, and destroyed all the wireless traffic that had been gathered.

    The nature of this privacy offence has confused some commentators and technologists. Some argue that Wi-Fi data in the public domain is not private, and "by definition" (so they like to say) categorically could not be private. Accordingly some believed Google was within its rights to do whatever it liked with such found data. But that reasoning fails to grasp the technicality that Data Protection laws in Europe, Australia and elsewhere do not essentially distinguish “public” from "private". In fact the word “private” doesn’t even appear in Australia’s “Privacy Act”. If data is identifiable, then privacy rights generally attach to it irrespective of how it is collected.

  • Facebook photo tagging was ruled unlawful by European privacy regulators in mid 2012, on the grounds it represents a collection of PII (by the operation of the biometric matching algorithm) without consent. By late 2012 Facebook was forced to shut down facial recognition and tag suggestions in the EU. This was quite a show of force over one of the most powerful companies of the digital age. More recently Facebook has started to re-introduce photo tagging, prompting the German privacy regulator to reaffirm that this use of biometrics is counter to their privacy laws.

It's never too late

So, is it really too late for privacy? Outside the United States at least, established privacy doctrine and consumer protections have taken technocrats by surprise. They have found, perhaps counter intuitively, that they are not as free as they thought to exploit all personal data that comes their way.

Privacy is not threatened so much by technology as it is by sloppy thinking and, I'm afraid, by wishful thinking on the part of some vested interests. Privacy and anonymity, on close reflection, are not the same thing, and we shouldn't want them to be! It's clearly important to be known by others in a civilised society, and it's equally important that those who do know us, are reasonably restrained in how they use that knowledge.

Posted in Social Networking, Social Media, Privacy

Getting the security privacy balance wrong

National security analyst Dr Anthony Bergin of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute wrote of the government’s data retention proposals in the Sydney Morning Herald of August 14. I am a privacy advocate who accepts in fact that law enforcement needs new methods to deal with terrorism. I myself do trust there is a case for greater data retention in order to weed out terrorist preparations, but I reject Bergin’s patronising call that “Privacy must take a back seat to security”. He speaks soothingly of balance yet he rejects privacy out of hand. As such his argument for balance is anything but balanced.

Suspicions are rightly raised by the murkiness of the Australian government’s half-baked data retention proposals and by our leaders’ excruciating inability to speak cogently even about the basics. They bandy about metaphors for metadata that are so bad, they smack of misdirection. Telecommunications metadata is vastly more complex than addresses on envelopes; for one thing, the Dynamic IP Addresses of cell phones means for police to tell who made a call requires far more data than ASIO and AFP are letting on (more on this by Internet expert Geoff Huston here).

The way authorities jettison privacy so casually is of grave concern. Either they do not understand privacy, or they’re paying lip service to it. In truth, data privacy is simply about restraint. Organisations must explain what personal data they collect, why they collect, who else gets to access the data, and what they do with it. These principles are not at all at odds with national security. It’s given his polar status as cult hero or pariah, Ed Snowden has in my view provided some of best balanced analysis of national security and civil rights.

Cryptographers have a saying: There is no security in obscurity. Nothing is gained by governments keeping the existence of surveillance programs secret or unexplained, but the essential trust of the public is lost when their privacy is treated with contempt.

Posted in Trust, Security, Privacy

Postcard from Monterey 2 #CISmcc

Second Day Reflections from CIS Monterey.

Follow along on Twitter at #CISmcc (for the Monterey Conference Centre).

The Attributes push

At CIS 2013 in Napa a year ago, several of us sensed a critical shift in focus amongst the identerati - from identity to attributes. OIX launched the Attributes Exchange Network (AXN) architecture, important commentators like Andrew Nash were saying, 'hey, attributes are more interesting than identity', and my own #CISnapa talk went so far as to argue we should forget about identity altogether. There was a change in the air, but still, it was all pretty theoretical.

Twelve months on, and the Attributes push has become entirely practical. If there was a Word Cloud for the NSTIC session, my hunch is that "attributes" would dominate over "identity". Several live NSTIC pilots are all about the Attributes.

ID.me is a new company started by US military veterans, with the aim of improving access for the veterans community to discounted goods and services and other entitlements. Founders Matt Thompson and Blake Hall are not identerati -- they're entirely focused on improving online access for their constituents to a big and growing range of retailers and services, and offer a choice of credentials for proving veterans bona fides. It's central to the ID.me model that users reveal as little as possible about their personal identities, while having their veterans' status and entitlements established securely and privately.

Another NSTIC pilot Relying Party is the financial service sector infrastructure provider Broadridge. Adrian Chernoff, VP for Digital Strategy, gave a compelling account of the need to change business models to take maximum advantage of digital identity. Broadridge recently announced a JV with Pitney Bowes called Inlet, which will enable the secure sharing of discrete and validated attributes - like name, address and social security number - in an NSTIC compliant architecture.

Mind Altering

Yesterday I said in my #CISmcc diary that I hoped to change my mind about something here, and half way through Day 2, I was delighted it was already happening. I've got a new attitude about NSTIC.

Over the past six months, I had come to fear NSTIC had lost its way. It's hard to judge totally accurately when lurking on the webcast from Sydney (at 4:00am) but the last plenary seemed pedestrian to me. And I'm afraid to say that some NSTIC committees have got a little testy. But today's NSTIC session here was a turning point. Not only are there a number or truly exciting pilots showing real progress, but Jeremy Grant has credible plans for improving accountability and momentum, and the new technology lead Paul Grassi is thinking outside the box and speaking out of school. The whole program seems fresh all over again.

In a packed presentation, Grassi impressed me enormously on a number of points:

  • Firstly, he advocates a pragmatic NSTIC-focused extension of the old US government Authentication Guide NIST SP 800-63. Rather than a formal revision, a companion document might be most realistic. Along the way, Grassi really nailed an issue which we identity professionals need to talk about more: language. He said that there are words in 800-63 that are "never used anywhere else in systems development". No wonder, as he says, it's still "hard to implement identity"!
  • Incidentally I chatted some more with Andrew Hughes about language; he is passionate about terms, and highlights that our term "Relying Party" is an especially terrible distraction for Service Providers whose reason-for-being has nothing to do with "relying" on anyone!
  • Secondly, Paul Grassi wants to "get very aggressive on attributes", including emphasis on practical measurement (since that's really what NIST is all about). I don't think I need to say anything more about that than Bravo!
  • And thirdly, Grassi asked "What if we got rid of LOAs?!". This kind of iconoclastic thinking is overdue, and was floated as part of a broad push to revamp the way government's orthodox thinking on Identity Assurance is translated to the business world. Grassi and Grant don't say LOAs can or should be abandoned by government, but they do see that shoving the rounded business concepts of identity into government's square hole has not done anyone much credit.

Just one small part of NSTIC annoyed me today: the persistent idea that federation hubs are inherently simpler than one-to-one authentication. They showed the following classic sort of 'before and after' shots, where it seems self-evident that a hub (here the Federal Cloud Credential Exchange FCCX) reduces complexity. The reality is that multilateral brokered arrangements between RPs and IdPs are far more complex than simple bilateral direct contracts. And moreover, the new forms of agreements are novel and untested in real world business. The time and cost and unpredictability of working out these new arrangements is not properly accounted for and has often been fatal to identity federations.

IMG 5412 BEFORE cropped
IMG 5413 AFTER cropped


The dog barks and this time the caravan turns around

One of the top talking points at #CISmcc has of course been FIDO. The FIDO Alliance goes from strength to strength; we heard they have over 130 members now (remember it started with four or five less than 18 months ago). On Saturday afternoon there was a packed-out FIDO show case with six vendors showing real FIDO-ready products. And today there was a three hour deep dive into the two flagship FIDO protocols UAF (which enables better sharing of strong authentication signals such that passwords may be eliminated) and U2F (which standardises and strengthens Two Factor Authentication).

FIDO's marketing messages are improving all the time, thanks to a special focus on strategic marketing which was given its own working group. In particular, the Alliance is steadily clarifying the distinction between identity and authentication, and sticking adamantly to the latter. In other words, FIDO is really all about the attributes. FIDO leaves identity as a problem to be addressed further up the stack, and dedicates itself to strengthening the authentication signal sent from end-point devices to servers.

The protocol tutorials were excellent, going into detail about how "Attestation Certificates" are used to convey the qualities and attributes of authentication hardware (such as device model, biometric modality, security certifications, elapsed time since last user verification etc) thus enabling nice fine-grained policy enforcement on the RP side. To my mind, UAF and U2F show how nature intended PKI to have been used all along!

Some confusion remains as to why FIDO has two protocols. I heard some quiet calls for UAF and U2F to converge, yet that would seem to put the elegance of U2F at risk. And it's noteworthy that U2F is being taken beyond the original one time password 2FA, with at least one biometric vendor at the showcase claiming to use it instead of the heavier UAF.

Surprising use cases

Finally, today brought more fresh use cases from cohorts of users we socially privileged identity engineers for the most part rarely think about. Another NSTIC pilot partner is AARP, a membership organization providing "information, advocacy and service" to older people, retirees and other special needs groups. AARP's Jim Barnett gave a compelling presentation on the need to extend from the classic "free" business models of Internet services, to new economically sustainable approaches that properly protect personal information. Barnett stressed that "free" has been great and 'we wouldn't be where we are today without it' but it's just not going to work for health records for example. And identity is central to that.

There's so much more I could report if I had time. But I need to get some sleep before another packed day. All this changing my mind is exhausting.

Cheers again from Monterey.

Posted in Security, Privacy, PKI, Language, Identity, Federated Identity, e-health

Webinar: Big Privacy

I'm presenting a Constellation Research webinar next week on my latest research into "Big Privacy" (June 18th in the US / June 19th in Australia). I hope you can join us.

Register here.

We live in an age where billionaires are self-made on the back of the most intangible of assets – the information they have amassed about us. That information used to be volunteered in forms and questionnaires and contracts but increasingly personal information is being observed and inferred.

The modern world is awash with data. It’s a new and infinitely re-usable raw material. Most of the raw data about us is an invisible by-product of our mundane digital lives, left behind by the gigabyte by ordinary people who do not perceive it let alone understand it.

Many Big Data and digital businesses proceed on the basis that all this raw data is up for grabs. There is a particular widespread assumption that data in the "public domain" is free-for-all, and if you’re clever enough to grab it, then you’re entitled to extract whatever you can from it.

In the webinar, I'll try to show how some of these assumptions are naive. The public is increasingly alarmed about Big Data and averse to unbridled data mining. Excessive data mining isn't just subjectively 'creepy'; it can be objectively unlawful in many parts of the world. Conventional data protection laws turn out to be surprisingly powerful in in the face of Big Data. Data miners ignore international privacy laws at their peril!

Today there are all sorts of initiatives trying to forge a new technology-privacy synthesis. They go by names like "Privacy Engineering" and "Privacy by Design". These are well meaning efforts but they can be a bit stilted. They typically overlook the strengths of conventional privacy law, and they can miss an opportunity to engage the engineering mind.

It’s not politically correct but I believe we must admit that privacy is full of contradictions and competing interests. We need to be more mature about privacy. Just as there is no such thing as perfect security, there can never be perfect privacy either. And is where the professional engineering mindset should be brought in, to help deal with conflicting requirements.

If we’re serious about Privacy by Design and Privacy Engineering then we need to acknowledge the tensions. That’s some of the thinking behind Constellation's new Big Privacy compact. To balance privacy and Big Data, we need to hold a conversation with users that respects the stresses and strains, and involves them in working through the new privacy deal.

The webinar will cover these highlights of the Big Privacy pact:

    • Respect and Restraint
    • Super transparency
    • And a fair deal for Personal Information.

Have a disruptive technology implementation story? Get recognised for your leadership. Apply for the 2014 SuperNova Awards for leaders in disruptive technology.

Posted in Social Media, Privacy, Constellation Research, Biometrics, Big Data

Three billion was a Snap

The latest Snowden revelations include the NSA's special programs for extracting photos and identifying from the Internet. Amongst other things the NSA uses their vast information resources to correlate location cues in photos -- buildings, streets and so on -- with satellite data, to work out where people are. They even search especially for passport photos, because these are better fodder for facial recognition algorithms. The audacity of these government surveillance activities continues to surprise us, and their secrecy is abhorrent.

Yet an ever greater scale of private sector surveillance has been going on for years in social media. With great pride, Facebook recently revealed its R&D in facial recognition. They showcased the brazenly named "DeepFace" biometric algorithm, which is claimed to be 97% accurate in recognising faces from regular images. Facebook has made a swaggering big investment in biometrics.

Data mining needs raw material, there's lots of it out there, and Facebook has been supremely clever at attracting it. It's been suggested that 20% of all photos now taken end up in Facebook. Even three years ago, Facebook held 10,000 times as many photographs as the Library of Congress:

Largest photo libraries
[Picture courtesy of the now retired 1000memories.com blog]

And Facebook will spend big buying other photo lodes. Last year they tried to buy Snapchat for the spectacular sum of three billion dollars. The figure had pundits reeling. How could a start-up company with 30 people be worth so much? All the usual dot com comparisons were made; the offer seemed a flight of fancy.

But no, the offer was a rational consideration for the precious raw material that lies buried in photo data.

Snapchat generates at least 100 million new images every day. Three billion dollars was, pardon me, a snap. I figure that at a ballpark internal rate of return of 10%, a $3B investment is equivalent to $300M p.a. so even if the Snapchat volume stopped growing, Facebook would have been paying one cent for every new snap, in perpetuity.

These days, we have learned from Snowden and the NSA that communications metadata is just as valuable as the content of our emails and phone calls. So remember that it's the same with photos. Each digital photo comes from a device that embeds within the image metadata usually including the time and place of when the picture was taken. And of course each Instagram or Snapchat is a social post, sent by an account holder with a history and rich context in which the image yields intimate real time information about what they're doing, when and where.

The hallmark of the Snapchat service is transience: all those snaps are supposed to flit from one screen to another before vaporising. Now of course that idea is contestable; enthusiasts worked out pretty quickly how to retrieve snaps from old memory. And in any case, transience is a red herring, perhaps a deliberate distraction, because the metadata matters more, and Snapchat admits in its Privacy Policy that it pretty well keeps the lot:

  • When you access or use our Services, we automatically collect information about you, including:
  • Usage Information: When you send or receive messages via our Services, we collect information about these messages, including the time, date, sender and recipient of the Snap. We also collect information about the number of messages sent and received between you and your friends and which friends you exchange messages with most frequently.
  • Log Information: We log information about your use of our websites, including your browser type and language, access times, pages viewed, your IP address and the website you visited before navigating to our websites.
  • Device Information: We may collect information about the computer or device you use to access our Services, including the hardware model, operating system and version, MAC address, unique device identifier, phone number, International Mobile Equipment Identity ("IMEI") and mobile network information. In addition, the Services may access your device's native phone book and image storage applications, with your consent, to facilitate your use of certain features of the Services.
  • Location Information: With your consent, we may collect information about the location of your device to facilitate your use of certain features of our Services, determine the speed at which your device is traveling, add location-based filters to your Snaps (such as local weather), and for any other purpose described in this privacy policy.

Snapchat goes on to declare it may use any of this information to "personalize and improve the Services and provide advertisements, content or features that match user profiles or interests" and it reserves the right to share any information with "vendors, consultants and other service providers who need access to such information to carry out work on our behalf".

So back to the data mining: nothing stops Snapchat -- or a new parent company -- running biometric facial recognition over the snaps as they pass through the servers, to extract additional "profile" information. And there's an extra kicker that makes Snapchats extra valuable for biometric data miners. The vast majority of Snapchats are selfies. So if you extract a biometric template from a snap, you already know who it belongs to, without anyone having to tag it. Snapchat would provide a hundred million auto-calibrations every day for facial recognition algorithms! On Facebook, the privacy aware turn off photo tagging, but with Snapchats, self identification is inherent to the experience and is unlikely to be ever be disabled.

NSA has all your selfies

As I've discussed before, the morbid thrill of Snowden's spying revelations has tended to overshadow his sober observations that when surveillance by the state is probably inevitable, we need to be discussing accountability.

While we're all ventilating about the NSA, it's time we also attended to private sector spying and properly debated the restraints that may be appropriate on corporate exploitation of social data.

Personally I'm much more worried that an infomopoly has all my selfies.

Have a disruptive technology implementation story? Get recognised for your leadership. Apply for the 2014 SuperNova Awards for leaders in disruptive technology.

Posted in Social Networking, Social Media, Privacy, Biometrics, Big Data

Big Privacy: a new Constellation Research Report

I've just completed a major new Constellation Research report looking at how today's privacy practices cope with Big Data. The report draws together my longstanding research on the counter-intuitive strengths of technology-neutral data protection laws, and melds it with my new Constellation colleagues' vast body of work in data analytics. The synergy is honestly exciting and illuminating.

Big Data promises tremendous benefits for a great many stakeholders but the potential gains are jeopardised by the excesses of a few. Some cavalier online businesses are propelled by a naive assumption that data in the "public domain" is up for grabs, and with that they often cross a line.

For example, there are apps and services now that will try to identify pictures you take of strangers in public, by matching them biometrically against data supersets compiled from social networking sites and other publically accessible databases. Many find such offerings quite creepy but they may be at a loss as to what to do about it, or even how to think through the issues objectively. Yet the very metaphor of data mining holds some of the clues. If, as some say, raw data is like crude oil, just waiting to be mined and exploited by enterprising prospecters, then surely there are limits, akin to mining permits?

Many think the law has not kept pace with technology, and that digital innovators are free to do what they like with any data they can get their hands on. But technologists repreatedly underestimate the strength of conventional data protection laws and regulations. The extraction of PII from raw data may be interpreted under technology neutral privacy principles as an act of Collection and as such is subject to existing statutes. Around the world, Google thus found they are not actually allowed to gather Personal Data that happens to be available in unencrypted Wi-Fi transmission as StreetView cars drive by homes and offices. And Facebook found they are not actually allowed to automatically identify people in photos through face recognition without consent. And Target probably would find, if they tried it outside the USA, that they cannot flag selected female customers as possibly pregnant by analysing their buying habits.

On the other hand, orthodox privacy policies and static user agreements do not cater for the way personal data can be conjured tomorrow from raw data collected today. Traditional privacy regimes require businesses to spell out what personally identifiable information (PII) they collect and why, and to restrict secondary usage. Yet with Big Data, with the best will in the world, a company might not know what data analytics will yield down the track. If mutual benefits for business and customer alike might be uncovered, a freeze-frame privacy arrangement may be counter-productive.

Thus the fit between data analytics and data privacy standards is complex and sometimes surprising. While existing laws are not to be underestimated, we do need something new. As far as I know it was Ray Wang in his Harvard Business Review blog who first called for a fresh privacy compact amongst users and businesses.

The spirit of data privacy is simply framed: organisations that know us should respect the knowledge they have, they should be open about what they know, and they should be restrained in what they do with it. In the Age of Big Data, let's have businesses respect the intelligence they extract from data mining, just as they should respect the knowledge they collect directly through forms and questionnaires.

I like the label "Big Privacy"; it is grandly optimistic, like "Big Data" itself, and at the same time implies a challenge to do better than regular privacy practices.

Ontario Privacy Commissioner Dr Ann Cavoukian writes about Big Privacy, describing it simply as "Privacy By Design writ large". But I think there must be more to it than that. Big Data is quantitatively but also qualitatively different from ordinary data analyis.

To summarise the basic elements of a Big Data compact:

  • Respect and Restraint: In the face of Big Data’s temptations, remember that privacy is not only about what we do with PII; just as important is what we choose not to do.
  • Super transparency: Who knows what lies ahead in Big Data? If data privacy means being open about what PII is collected and why, then advanced privacy means going further, telling people more about the business models and the sorts of results data mining is expected to return.
  • Engage customers in a fair deal for PII: Information businesses ought to set out what PII is really worth to them (especially when it is extracted in non-obvious ways from raw data) and offer a fair "price" for it, whether in the form of "free" products and services, or explicit payment.
  • Really innovate in privacy: There’s a common refrain that “privacy hampers innovation” but often that's an intellectually lazy cover for reserving the right to strip-mine PII. Real innovation lies in business practices which create and leverage PII while honoring privacy principles.

My report, "Big Privacy" Rises to the Challenges of Big Data may be downloaded from the Constellation Research website.

Posted in Social Media, Privacy, Constellation Research, Big Data

Who's listening to Ed Snowden?

In one of the most highly anticipated sessions ever at the annual South-by-Southwest (SXSW) culture festival, NSA whistle blower Ed Snowden appeared via live video link from Russia. He joined two privacy and security champions from the American Civil Liberties Union – Chris Soghoian and Ben Wizner – to canvass the vexed tensions between intelligence and law enforcement, personal freedom, government accountability and digital business models.

These guys traversed difficult ground, with respect and much nuance. They agreed the issues are tough, and that proper solutions are non-obvious and slow-coming. The transcript is available here.

Yet afterwards the headlines and tweet stream were dominated by "Snowden's Tips" for personal online security. It was as if Snowden had been conducting a self-help workshop or a Cryptoparty. He was reported to recommend we encrypt our hard drives, encrypt our communications, and use Tor (the special free-and-open-source encrypted browser). These are mostly fine suggestions but I am perplexed why they should be the main takeaways from a complex discussion. Are people listening to Snowdenis broader and more general policy lessons? I fear not. I believe people still conflate secrecy and privacy. At the macro level, the confusion makes it difficult to debate national security policy properly; at a micro level, even if crypto was practical for typical citizens, it is not a true privacy measure. Citizens need so much more than secrecy technologies, whether it's SSL-always-on at web sites, or do-it-yourself encryption.

Ed Snowden is a remarkably measured and thoughtful commentator on national security. Despite being hounded around the word, he is not given to sound bites. His principal concerns appear to be around public accountability, oversight and transparency. He speaks of the strengths and weaknesses of the governance systems already in place; he urges Congress to hold security agency heads to account.

When drawn on questions of technology, he doesn't dispense casual advice; instead he calls for multifaceted responses to our security dilemmas: more cryptological research, better random number generators, better testing, more robust cryptographic building blocks and more careful product design. Deep, complicated engineering stuff.

So how did the media, both mainstream and online alike, distill Snowden's sweeping analysis of politics, policy and engineering into three sterile and quasi-survivalist snippets?

Partly it's due to the good old sensationalism of all modern news media: everyone likes a David-and-Goliath angle where individuals face off against pitiless governments. And there's also the ruthless compression: newspapers cater for an audience with school-age reading levels and attention spans, and Twitter clips our contributions to 140 characters.

But there is also a deeper over-simplification of privacy going on which inhibits our progress.

Too often, people confuse privacy for secrecy. Privacy gets framed as a need to hide from prying eyes, and from that starting position, many advocates descend into a combative, everyone-for-themselves mindset.

However privacy has very little to do with secrecy. We shouldn't have to go underground to enjoy that fundamental human right to be let alone. The social reality is that most of us wish to lead rich and quite public lives. We actually want others to know us – to know what we do, what we like, and what we think – but all within limits. Digital privacy (or more clinically, data protection) is not about hiding; rather it is a state where those who know us are restrained in what they do with the knowledge they have about us.

Privacy is the protection you need when your affairs are not confidential!

So encryption is a sterile and very limited privacy measure. As the SXSW panellists agreed, today's encryption tools really are the preserve of deep technical specialists. Ben Wizner quipped that if the question is how can average users protect themselves online, and the answer is Tor, then "we have failed".

And the problems with cryptography are not just usability and customer experience. A fundamental challenge with the best encryption is that everyone needs to be running the tools. You cannot send out encrypted email unilaterally – you need to first make sure all your correspondents have installed the right software and they've got trusted copies of your encryption keys, or they won't be able to unscramble your messages.

Chris Soghoian also nailed the business problem that current digital revenue models are largely incompatible with encryption. The wondrous free services we enjoy from the Googles and Facebooks of the world are funded in the main by mining our data streams, figuring out our interests, habits and connections, and monetising that synthesised information. The web is in fact bankrolled by surveillance – by Big Business as opposed to government.

End-to-end encryption prevents data mining and would ruin the business model of the companies we've become attached to. If we were to get serious with encryption, we may have to cough up the true price for our modern digital lifestyles.

The SXSW privacy and security panellists know all this. Snowden in particular spent much of his time carefully reiterating many of the basics of data privacy. For instance he echoed the Collection Limitation Principle when he said of large companies that they "can't collect any data; [they] should only collect data and hold it for as long as necessary for the operation of the business". And the Openness Principle: "data should not be collected without people's knowledge and consent". If I was to summarise Snowden's SXSW presentation, I'd say privacy will only be improved by reforming the practices of both governments and big businesses, and by putting far more care into digital product development. Ed Snowden himself doesn't promote neat little technology tips.

It's still early days for the digital economy. We're experiencing an online re-run of the Wild West, with humble users understandably feeling forced to take measures into their own hands. So many individuals have become hungry for defensive online tools and tips. But privacy is more about politics and regulation than technology. I hope that people listen more closely to Ed Snowden on policy, and that his lasting legacy is more about legal reform and transparency than Do-It-Yourself encryption.

Posted in Security, Privacy, Internet

The strengths and weaknesses of Data Privacy in the Age of Big Data

This is the abstract of a current privacy conference proposal.

Synopsis

Many Big Data and online businesses proceed on a naive assumption that data in the "public domain" is up for grabs; technocrats are often surprised that conventional data protection laws can be interpreted to cover the extraction of PII from raw data. On the other hand, orthodox privacy frameworks don't cater for the way PII can be created in future from raw data collected today. This presentation will bridge the conceptual gap between data analytics and privacy, and offer new dynamic consent models to civilize the trade in PII for goods and services.

Abstract

It’s often said that technology has outpaced privacy law, yet by and large that's just not the case. Technology has certainly outpaced decency, with Big Data and biometrics in particular becoming increasingly invasive. However OECD data privacy principles set out over thirty years ago still serve us well. Outside the US, rights-based privacy law has proven effective against today's technocrats' most worrying business practices, based as they are on taking liberties with any data that comes their way. To borrow from Niels Bohr, technologists who are not surprised by data privacy have probably not understood it.

The cornerstone of data privacy in most places is the Collection Limitation principle, which holds that organizations should not collect Personally Identifiable Information beyond their express needs. It is the conceptual cousin of security's core Need-to-Know Principle, and the best starting point for Privacy-by-Design. The Collection Limitation principle is technology neutral and thus blind to the manner of collection. Whether PII is collected directly by questionnaire or indirectly via biometric facial recognition or data mining, data privacy laws apply.

It’s not for nothing we refer to "data mining". But few of those unlicensed data gold diggers seem to understand that the synthesis of fresh PII from raw data (including the identification of anonymous records like photos) is merely another form of collection. The real challenge in Big Data is that we don’t know what we’ll find as we refine the techniques. With the best will in the world, it is hard to disclose in a conventional Privacy Policy what PII might be collected through synthesis down the track. The age of Big Data demands a new privacy compact between organisations and individuals. High minded organizations will promise to keep people abreast of new collections and will offer ways to opt in, and out and in again, as the PII-for-service bargain continues to evolve.

Posted in Social Networking, Privacy, Biometrics, Big Data

How are we to defend anonymity?

If anonymity is important, what is the legal basis for defending it?
I find that conventional data privacy law in most places around the world already protects anonymity, insofar as the act of de-anonymization represents an act of PII Collection - the creation of a named record. As such, de-anonymization cannot be lawfully performed without an express need to to do, or consent.

Foreword

Cynics have been asking the same rhetorical question "is privacy dead?" for at least 40 years. Certainly information technology and ubiquitous connectivity have made it nearly impossible to hide, and so anonymity is critically ill. But privacy is not the same thing as secrecy; privacy is a state where those who know us, respect the knowledge they have about us. Privacy generally doesn't require us hiding from anyone; it requires restraint on the part of those who hold Personal Information about us.

The typical public response to data breaches, government surveillance and invasions like social media facial recognition is vociferous. People in general energetically assert their rights to not be tracked online, or to have their personal information exploited behind their backs. These reactions show that the idea of privacy alive and well.

The end of anonymity perhaps

Against a backdrop of spying revelations and excesses by social media companies especially in regards to facial recognition, there have been recent calls for a "new jurisprudence of anonymity"; see Yale law professor Jed Rubenfeld writing in the Washington Post of 13 Jan 2014. I wonder if there is another way to crack the nut? Because any new jurisprudence is going to take a very long time.

Instead, I suggest we leverage the way most international privacy law and privacy experience -- going back decades -- is technology neutral with regards to the method of collection. In some jurisdictions like Australia, the term "collection" is not even defined in privacy law. Instead, the law just uses the normal plain English sense of the word, when it frames principles like Collection Limitation: basically, you are not allowed to collect (by any means) Personally Identifiable Information without a good reasonable express reason. It means that if PII gets into a data system, the system is accountable under privacy law for that PII, no matter how it got there.

This technology neutral view of PII collection has satisfying ramifications for all the people who intuit that Big Data has got too "creepy". We can argue that if a named record is produced afresh by a Big Data process (especially if that record is produced without the named person being aware of it, and from raw data that was originally collected for some other purpose) then that record has logically been collected. Whether PII is collected directly, or collected indirectly, or is in fact created by an obscure process, privacy law is largely agnostic.

Prof Rubenfeld wrote:

  • "The NSA program isn’t really about gathering data. It's about mining data. All the data are there already, digitally stored and collected by telecom giants, just waiting." [italics in original]

I suggest that the output of the data mining, if it is personally identifiable and especially if it has been rendered identifiable by processing previously anonymous raw data, has is a fresh collection by the mining operation. As such, the miners should be accountable for their newly minted PII, just as though they had collected gathered it directly from the persons concerned.

For now, I don't want to go further and argue the rights and wrongs of surveillance. I just want to show a new way to frame the privacy questions in surveillance and big data, making use of existing jurisprudence. If I am right and the NSA is in effect collecting PII as it goes about its data mining, then that provides a possibly fresh understanding of what's going on, within which we can objectively analyse the rights and wrongs.

I am actually the first to admit that within this frame, the NSA might still be justified in mining data, and there might be no actual technical breach of information privacy law, if for instance the NSA enjoys a law enforcement exemption. These are important questions that need to be debated, but elsewhere (see my recent blog on our preparedness to actually have such a debate). My purpose right now is to frame a way to defend anonymity using as much existing legal infrastructure as possible.

But Collection is not limited everywhere

There is an important legal-technical question in all this: Is the collection of PII actually regulated? In Europe, Australia, New Zealand and in dozens of countries, collection is limited, but in the USA, there is no general restriction against collecting PII. America has no broad data protection law, and in any case, the Fair Information Practice Principles (FIPPs) don't include a Collection Limitation principle.

So there may be few regulations in the USA that would carry my argument there! Nevertheless, surely we can use international jurisprudence in Collection Limitation instead of creating new American jurisprudence around anonymity?

So I'd like to put the following questions Jed Rubenfeld:


  • Do technology neutral Collection Limitation Principles in theory provide a way to bring de-anonymised data into scope for data privacy laws? Is this a way to address peoples' concerns with Big Data?
  • How does international jurisprudence around Collection Limitation translate to American schools of legal thought?
  • Does this way of looking at the problem create new impetus for Collection Limitation to be introduced into American privacy principles, especially the FIPPs?

Appendix: "Applying Information Privacy Norms to Re-Identification"

In 2013 I presented some of these ideas to an online symposium at the Harvard Law School Petrie-Flom Center, on the Law, Ethics & Science of Re-identification Demonstrations. What follows is an extract from that presentation, in which I spell out carefully the argument -- which was not obvious to some at the time -- that when genetics researchers combine different data sets to demonstrate re-identification of donated genomic material, they are in effect collecting patient PII. I argue that this type of collection should be subject to ethics committee approval just as if the researchers were collecting the identities from the patients directly.

... I am aware of two distinct re-identification demonstrations that have raised awareness of the issues recently. In the first, Yaniv Erlich [at MIT's Whitehead Institute] used what I understand are new statistical techniques to re-identify a number of subjects that had donated genetic material anonymously to the 1000 Genomes project. He did this by correlating genes in the published anonymous samples with genes in named samples available from genealogical databases. The 1000 Genomes consent form reassured participants that re-identification would be "very hard". In the second notable demo, Latanya Sweeney re-identified volunteers in the Personal Genome Project using her previously published method of using a few demographic values (such as date or birth, sex and postal code) extracted from the otherwise anonymous records.

A great deal of the debate around these cases has focused on the consent forms and the research subjects’ expectations of anonymity. These are important matters for sure, yet for me the ethical issue in de-anonymisation demonstrations is more about the obligations of third parties doing the identification who had nothing to do with the original informed consent arrangements. The act of recording a person’s name against erstwhile anonymous data represents a collection of personal information. The implications for genomic data re-identification are clear.

Let’s consider Subject S who donates her DNA, ostensibly anonymously, to a Researcher R1, under some consent arrangement which concedes there is a possibility that S will be re-identified. And indeed, some time later, an independent researcher R2 does identify S and links her to the DNA sample. The fact is that R2 has collected personal information about S. If R2 has no relationship with S, then S has not consented to this new collection of her personal information.

Even if the consent form signed at the time of the original collection includes a disclaimer that absolute anonymity cannot be guaranteed, re-identifying the DNA sample later represents a new collection, one that has been undertaken without any consent. Given that S has no knowledge of R2, there can be no implied consent in her original understanding with R1, even if absolute anonymity was disclaimed.

Naturally the re-identification demonstrations have served a purpose. It is undoubtedly important that the limits of anonymity be properly understood, and the work of Yaniv and Latanya contribute to that. Nevertheless, these demonstrations were undertaken without the knowledge much less the consent of the individuals concerned. I contend that bioinformaticians using clever techniques to attach names to anonymous samples need ethics approval, just as they would if they were taking fresh samples from the people concerned.

See also my letter to the editor of Science magazine.

Posted in Privacy, Big Data

The Snapchat data breach

Yesterday it was reported by The Verge that anonymous hackers have accessed Snapchat's user database and posted 4.6 million user names and phone numbers. In an apparent effort to soften the blow, two digits of the phone numbers were redacted. So we might assume this is a "white hat" exercise, designed to shame Snapchat into improving their security. Indeed, a few days ago Snapchat themselves said they had been warned of vulnerabilities in their APIs that would allow a mass upload of user records.

The response of many has been, well, so what? Some people have casually likened Snapchat's list to a public White Pages; others have played it down as "just email addresses".

Let's look more closely. The leaked list was not in fact public names and phone numbers; it was user names and phone numbers. User names might often be email addresses but these are typically aliases; people frequently choose email addresses that reveal little or nothing of their real world identity. We should assume there is intent in an obscure email address for the individual to remain secret.

Identity theft has become a highly organised criminal enterprise. Crime gangs patiently acquire multiple data sets over many months, sometimes years, gradually piecing together detailed personal profiles. It's been shown time and time again by privacy researchers (perhaps most notably Latanya Sweeney) that re-identification is enabled by linking diverse data sets. And for this purpose, email addresses and phone numbers are superbly valuable indices for correlating an individual's various records. Your email address is common across most of your social media registrations. And your phone number allows your real name and street address to be looked up from reverse White Pages. So the Snapchat breach could be used to join aliases or email addresses to real names and addresses via the phone numbers. For a social engineering attack on a call centre -- or even to open a new bank account -- an identity thief can go an awful long way with real name, street address, email address and phone number.

I was asked in an interview to compare the theft of stolen phone numbers with social security numbers. I surprised the interviewer when I said phone numbers are probably even more valuable to the highly organised ID thief, for they can be used to index names in public directories, and to link different data sets, in ways that SSNs (or credit card numbers for that matter) cannot.

So let us start to treat all personal inormation -- especially when aggregated in bulk -- more seriously! And let's be more cautious in the way we categorise personal or Personally Identifiable Information (PII).

Importantly, most regulatory definitions of PII already embody the proper degree of caution. Look carefully at the US government definition of Personally Identifiable Information:

  • information that can be used to distinguish or trace an individual’s identity, either alone or when combined with other personal or identifying information that is linked or linkable to a specific individual (underline added).

This means that items of data can constitute PII if other data can be combined to identify the person concerned. That is, the fragments are regarded as PII even if it is the whole that does the identifying.

And remember that the middle I in PII stands for Identifiable, and not, as many people presume, Identifying. To meet the definition of PII, data need not uniquely identify a person, it merely needs to be directly or indirectly identifiable with a person. And this is how it should be when we heed the way information technologies enable identification through linkages.

Almost anywhere else in the world, data stores like Snapchat's would automatically fall under data protection and information privacy laws; regulators would take a close look at whether the company had complied with the OECD Privacy Principles, and whether Snapchat's security measures were fit for purpose given the PII concerned. But in the USA, companies and commentators alike still have trouble working out how serious these breaches are. Each new breach is treated in an ad hoc manner, often with people finessing the difference between credit card numbers -- as in the recent Target breach -- and "mere" email addresses like those in the Snapchat and Epsilon episodes.

Surely the time has come to simply give proper regulatory protection to all PII.

Posted in Social Networking, Social Media, Security, Privacy, Identity, Fraud, Big Data