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BlackBerry Security Summit, 29 July 2014

Summary: BlackBerry is poised for a fresh and well differentiated play in the Internet of Things, with its combination of handset hardware security, its uniquely rated QNX operating system kernel, and its experience with the FIDO device authentication protocols.

To put it plainly, BlackBerry is not cool.

And neither is security.

But maybe two wrongs can make a right, in terms of a compelling story. BlackBerry's security story has always been strong, it's getting stronger, and it could save them.

Today I attended the BlackBerry Security Summit in New York City (Disclosure: my travel and accommodation were paid by BlackBerry). The event was announced very recently; none of my colleagues had heard of it. So what was the compelling need to put on a security show in New York? It turned out to be the 9:00am announcement that BlackBerry is acquiring the German voice security specialists Secusmart. BlackBerry and Secusmart have worked together for a long time; their stated aim is to put a real secure phone in the "hand of every President and every Chancellor".

Secusmart CEO Hans-Christoph Quelle is a forceful champion of voice security; in this age of evidently routine spying by state and competitors alike, there is enormous demand building for counter-surveillance in telephony and messaging. Secusmart is also responsible for the highly rated Micro SD cards that BlackBerry proudly use as removable security modules in their handsets. And this is where the SecuSmart tie-up really resonates for me. It comes hot on the heels of last week's Cloud Security Summit, where there was so much support for personal Hardware Security Modules (HSMs), be they Micro SD cards, USB keys, NFC Secure Elements, the good old "Trusted Platform Module" (TPM) or any number of proprietary chip sets.

Today's event also showcased BlackBerry's QNX division (acquired in 2010) and its secure operating system. CEO John Chen reckons that the software in 50% of connected cars runs on the QNX OS (and in high reliability settings like power stations, wind turbines and even gaming machines, the penetration is even higher). And so he is positioning BlackBerry as a major player in the Internet of Things.

We heard from QNX founder Dan Dodge about the elegance of their system. At just 100,000 lines of code, Dodge stressed that his team knows the software inside-out. There is not a single like of code in their OS that QNX did not write themselves. In contrast, such mastery is utterly impossible in the 15,000,000 lines that make up Linux or the estimated 50-70 million lines in Windows. It happens that I've recently lamented the parlous state of software quality and the need to return to first principles security. So I am on Dan Dodge's wavelength.

BlackBerry's security people had a little bit to say about identity as well, and apparently more's to come. For now, they are flagging that with 250 million customers in their messaging system, BBM represents "one of the biggest identity systems in the world". And as such the company does plan to "federate" it somehow. They reminded us at the same time of the BlackBerry Cloud slated for launch in December.

Going forward, the importance of strong, physical Two Factor Authentication for accessing the cloud is almost a given now. nd the smartphone is fast becoming the predominant access mechanism, so the combination of secure elements, handsets and high security infrastructure is potent.

There's a lot that BlackBerry is keeping close to its chest, but for me one extant piece of the IoT puzzle was conspicuously absent today: the role of the FIDO Alliance protocols. After all, BlackBerry has been a FIDO Board Member for a long time. It seems to me that FIDO's protocols for exchanging verified authentication signals and information about devices should be an important element of BlackBerry's play in both its software infrastructure and its devices.

In closing, I'll revisit the very first thing we heard at today's event. It was a video testimonial, telling us "If you need nuclear security, you need BlackBerry". As I said, security really isn't cool. Jazzing up the company's ability to deliver "nuclear" grade to demanding clients is actually not the right message. Security in the Internet of Things -- and therefore in everyday life -- may turn out to be just as important.

We basically know that nuclear power plants are inherently risky; we know that planes will occasionally fall out of the sky. Paradoxically, the community has a reasonable appetite for risk and failures in very complex systems like those. Individually and/or collectively we have decided we just can't live without electricity and travel and so we've come to settle on a roughly acceptable finite cost in terms of failures. But when the mundanities of life go digital, the tolerance of failure will drop. When our cars and thermostats and light switches are connected to the Internet, and when a bug or a script kiddie's stunt can soon send whole neighbourhoods into a spin, consumers won't stand for it.

So the very best security we can currently engineer is in fact going to be necessary at scale for smart appliances, wearables, connected homes, smart meters and networked cars. We need a different gauge for this type of security, and it's going to be very tough to engineer and deploy economically. But right now, with its deep understanding of dependable OS's and commitment to high quality device hardware, it seems to me BlackBerry has a head-start in the Internet of Things.

Posted in Software engineering, Security, Identity, Cloud

Postcard from Monterey 3 #CISmcc

Days 3 and 4 at CIS Monterey.

Andre Durand's Keynote

The main sessions at the Cloud Identity Summit (namely days three and four overall) kicked off with keynotes from Ping Identity chief Andre Durand, New Zealand technology commentator Ben Kepes, and Ping Technical Director Mark Diodati. I'd like to concentrate on Andre's speech for it was truly fresh.

Andre has an infectious enthusiasm for identity, and is a magnificent host to boot. As I recall, his CIS keynote last year in Napa was pretty simply a dedication to the industry he loves. Not that there's anything wrong with that. But this year he went a whole lot further, with a rich deep dive into some things we take for granted: identity tokens and the multitude of security domains that bound our daily lives.

It's famously been said that "identity is the new perimeter" and Andre says that view informs all they do at Ping. It's easy I think to read that slogan to mean security priorities (and careers) are moving from firewalls to IDAM, but the meaning runs deeper. Identity is meaningless without context, and each context has an edge that defines it. Identity is largely about boundaries, and closure.

  • MyPOV and as an aside: The move to "open" identities which has powered IDAM for a over a decade is subject to natural limits that arise precisely because identities are perimeters. All identities are closed in some way. My identity as an employee means nothing beyond the business activities of my employer; my identity as an American Express Cardholder has no currency at stores that don't accept Amex; my identity as a Qantas OneWorld frequent flyer gets me nowhere at United Airlines (nor very far at American, much to my surprise). We discovered years ago that PKI works well in closed communities like government, pharmaceutical supply chains and the GSM network, but that general purpose identity certificates are hopeless. So we would do well to appreciate that "open" cross-domain identity management is actually a special case and that closed IDAM systems are the general case.

Andre reviewed the amazing zoo of hardware tokens we use from day to day. He gave scores of examples, including driver licenses of course but license plates too; house key, car key, garage opener, office key; the insignias of soldiers and law enforcement officers; airline tickets, luggage tags and boarding passes; the stamps on the arms of nightclub patrons and the increasingly sophisticated bracelets of theme park customers; and tattoos. Especially vivid was Andre's account of how his little girl on arriving at CIS during the set-up was not much concerned with all the potential playthings but was utterly rapt to get her ID badge, for it made her "official".

IMG 5493 Ping Durand CISmcc Tokens make us official

Tokens indeed have always had talismanic powers.

Then we were given a fly-on-the-wall slide show of how Andre typically starts his day. By 7:30am he has accessed half a dozen token-controlled physical security zones, from his home and garage, through the road system, the car park, the office building, the elevator, the company offices and his own corner office. And he hasn't even logged into cyberspace yet! He left unsaid whether or not all these domains might be "federated".

  • MyPOV: Isn't it curious that we never seem to beg for 'Single Sign On' of our physical keys and spaces? I suspect we know instinctively that one-key-fits-all would be ridiculously expensive to retrofit and would require fantastical cooperation between physical property controllers. We only try to federate virtual domains because the most common "keys" - passwords - suck, and because we tend to underestimate the the cost of cooperation amongst digital RPs.
IMG 5493 Ping Durand CISmcc Tokens properties

Tokens are, as Andre reminded us, on hand when you need them, easy to use, easy to revoke, and hard to steal (at least without being noticed). And they're non-promiscuous in respect of the personal information they disclose about their bearers. It's a wondrous set of properties, which we should perhaps be more conscious of in our work. And tokens can be used off-line.

  • MyPOV: The point about tokens working offline is paramount. It's a largely forgotten value. Andre's compelling take on tokens makes for a welcome contrast to the rarely questioned predominance of the cloud. Managing and resolving identity in the cloud complicates architectures, concentrates more of our personal data, and puts privacy at risk (for it's harder to unweave all the traditionally independent tracks of our lives).

In closing, Andre asked a rhetorical question which was probably forming in most attendees' minds: What is the ultimate token? His answer had a nice twist. I thought he'd say it's the mobile device. With so much value now remote, multi-factor cloud access control is crucial; the smart phone is the cloud control du jour and could easily become the paragon of tokens. But no, Andre considers that a group of IDAM standards could be the future "universal token" insofar as they beget interoperability and portability.

He said of the whole IDAM industry "together we are networking identity". That's a lovely sentiment and I would never wish to spoil Andre Durand's distinctive inclusion, but on that point technically he's wrong, for really we are networking attributes! More on that below and in my previous #CISmcc diary notes.

The identity family tree

My own CISmcc talk came at the end of Day 4. I think it was well received; the tweet stream was certainly keen and picked up the points I most wanted to make. Attendance was great, for which I should probably thank Andre Durand, because he staged the Closing Beach Party straight afterwards.

I'll post an annotated copy of my slides shortly. In brief I presented my research on the evolution of digital identity. There are plenty of examples of how identity technologies and identification processes have improved over time, with steadily stronger processes, regulations and authenticators. It's fascinating too how industries adopt authentication features from one another. Internet banking for example took the one-time password fob from late 90's technology companies, and the Australian PKI de facto proof-of-identity rules were inspired by the standard "100 point check" mandated for account origination.

Steve Wilson CIS2014 Authentication Family Tree  Bank identity evolves blog CISmcc

Clearly identity techniques shift continuously. What I want to do is systematise these shifts under a single unifying "phylogeny"; that is, a rigorously worked-out family tree. I once used the metaphor of a family tree in a training course to help people organise their thinking about authentication, but the inter-relationships between techniques was guesswork on my part. Now I'm curious if there is a real family tree that can explain the profusion of identities we have been working so long on simplifying, often to little avail.

Steve Wilson CIS2014 Authentication Family Tree (1 0) CISmcc CIS Cloud Identity

True Darwinian evolution requires there to be replicators that correspond to the heritable traits. Evolution results when the proportions of those replicators in the "gene pool" drift over generations as survival pressures in the environment filter beneficial traits. The definition of Digital Identity as a set of claims or attributes provides a starting point for a Darwinian treatment. I observe that identity attributes are like "Memes" - the inherited units of culture first proposed by biologist Richard Dawkins. In my research I am trying to define sets of available "characters" corresponding to technological, business and regulatory features of our diverse identities, and I'm experimenting with phylogenetic modelling programs to see what patterns emerge in sets of character traits shared by those identities.

Steve Wilson CIS2014 Authentication Family Tree  Memome Characters blog CISmcc

So what? A rigorous scientific model for identity evolution would have many benefits. First and foremost it would have explanatory power. I do not believe that as an industry we have a satisfactory explanation for the failure of such apparently good ideas as Information Cards. Nor for promising federation projects like the Australian banking sector's "Trust Centre" and "MAMBO" lifetime portable account number. I reckon we have been "over federating" identity; my hunch is that identities have evolved to fit particular niches in the business ecosystem to such an extent that taking a student ID for instance and using it to log on to a bank is like dropping a saltwater fish into a freshwater tank. A stronger understanding of how attributes are organically interrelated would help us better plan federated identity, and to even do "memetic engineering" of the attributes we really want to re-use between applications and contexts.

If a phylogenetic tree can be revealed, it would confirm the 'secret lives' of attributes and thereby lend more legitimacy to the Attributes Push (which coincidentally some of us first spotted at a previous CIS, in 2013). It would also provide evidence that identification risks in local environments are why identities have come to be the way they are. In turn, we could pay more respect to authentication's idiosyncrasies, instead of trying to pigeonhole them into four rigid Levels of Assurance. At Sunday's NSTIC session, CTO Paul Grassi floated the idea of getting rid of LOAs. That would be a bold move of course; it could be helped along by a new fresh focus to attributes. And of course we kept hearing throughout CIS Monterey about the FIDO Alliance with its devotion to authentication through verified device attributes, and its strategy to stay away from the abstract business of identities.

Steve Wilson CIS2014 Authentication Family Tree  FIDO blog CISmcc

Reflections on CIS 2014

I spoke with many people at CIS about what makes this event so different. There's the wonderful family program of course, and the atmosphere that creates. And there's the paradoxical collegiality. Ping has always done a marvelous job of collaborating in various standards groups, and likewise with its conference, Ping's people work hard to create a professional, non-competitive environment. There are a few notable absentees of course but all the exhibitors and speakers I spoke to - including Ping's direct competitors - endorsed CIS as a safe and important place to participate in the identity community, and to do business.

But as a researcher and analyst, the Cloud Identity Summit is where I think you can see the future. People report hearing about things for the first time at a CIS, only to find those things coming true a year or two later. It's because there are so many influencers here.

Last year one example was the Attributes Push. This year, the onus on Attributes has become entirely mainstream. For example, the NSTIC pilot partner ID.me (a start-up business focused on improving veterans' access to online discounts through improved verification of entitlements) talks proudly of their ability to convey attributes and reduce the exposure of identity. And Paul Grassi proposes much more focus on Attributes from 2015.

Another example is the "Authorization Agent" (AZA) proposed for SSO in mobile platforms, which was brand new when Paul Madsen presented it at CIS Napa in 2013. Twelve months on, AZA has broadened into the Native Apps (NAPPS) OpenID Working Group.

Then there are the things that are nearly completely normalised. Take mobile devices. They figured in just about every CISmcc presentation, but were rarely called out. Mobile is simply the way things are now.

But there was a lot of explicit mention of hardware. I've already made much of Andre Durand's keynote on tokens. It was the same throughout the event.

    • There was a session on hybrid Physical and Logical Access Control Systems (PACS-LACS) featuring the US Government's PIV-I smartcard standard and the major ongoing R&D on that platform sponsored by DHS.
    • Companies like SecureKey are devoted to hardware-based keys, increasingly embedded in "street IDs" like driver licenses, and are working with numerous players deep in the SIM and smartcard supply chains.
    • The FIDO Alliance is fundamentally about hardware security, leveraging embedded key pairs to attest to the pedigree of authenticator models and the attributes that they transmit on behalf of their verified users. FIDO promises to open up the latent authentication power of many 100s of millions of devices already featuring Secure Elements of one kind or another. That is PKI the way nature intended all along.
    • And the good old concept of "What You See Is What You Sign" (WYSIWYS) is making a comeback, with mobile platform players appreciating that users of smartphones need reliable cues in the UX as to the integrity of transaction data served up in their rich operating systems. Clearly some exciting R&D lies ahead.

What's next?

In my view, the Cloud Identity Summit is the only not-to-be missed event on the IDAM calendar. So long may it continue. And if CIS is where you go to see the future, what's next?

    • Judging by CISmcc, I reckon we're going to see entire sessions next year devoted to Continuous Authentication, in which signals are collected from wearables and the Internet of Things at large, to gain insights into the state of the user at every important juncture.
    • With the disciplined separation of abstract identities from concrete attributes, we're going to need an Digital Identity Stack for reference. FIDO's pyramid is on the right track, but it needs some work. I'm not sure the pyramid is the right visualisation; for one thing it evokes Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs in which the pinnacle corresponds to luxuries not essentials!
    • Momentum will grow around Relationships. Kantara's new Identity Relationship Management (IRM) WG was talked about in the CISmcc corridors. I am not sure we're all using the word in the same way, but it's a great trend, for Digital Identity is only really a means to an end, and it's the relationships they support that make identities important.

So there's much to look forward to!

See you again next year (I hope) in Monterey!

Posted in Smartcards, PKI, Language, Identity, Federated Identity, Cloud

Postcard from Monterey 2 #CISmcc

Second Day Reflections from CIS Monterey.

Follow along on Twitter at #CISmcc (for the Monterey Conference Centre).

The attributes push

At CIS 2013 in Napa a year ago, several of us sensed a critical shift in focus amongst the identerati - from identity to attributes. OIX launched the Attributes Exchange Network (AXN) architecture, important commentators like Andrew Nash were saying, 'hey, attributes are more interesting than identity', and my own #CISnapa talk went so far as to argue we should forget about identity altogether. There was a change in the air, but still, it was all pretty theoretical.

Twelve months on, and the Attributes push has become entirely practical. If there was a Word Cloud for the NSTIC session, my hunch is that "attributes" would dominate over "identity". Several live NSTIC pilots are all about the Attributes.

ID.me is a new company started by US military veterans, with the aim of improving access for the veterans community to discounted goods and services and other entitlements. Founders Matt Thompson and Blake Hall are not identerati -- they're entirely focused on improving online access for their constituents to a big and growing range of retailers and services, and offer a choice of credentials for proving veterans bona fides. It's central to the ID.me model that users reveal as little as possible about their personal identities, while having their veterans' status and entitlements established securely and privately.

Another NSTIC pilot Relying Party is the financial service sector infrastructure provider Broadridge. Adrian Chernoff, VP for Digital Strategy, gave a compelling account of the need to change business models to take maximum advantage of digital identity. Broadridge recently annoucned a JV with Pitney Bowes called Inlet, which will enable the secure sharing of discrete and validated attributes - like name, address and social security number - in an NSTIC compliant architecture.

Mind bending

Yesterday I said in my CISmcc diary that I hoped to change my mind at #CISmcc about something, and half way through Day 2, I was delighted it was already happening. I've got a new attitude about NSTIC.

Over the past six months, I had come to fear http://www.nist.gov/nstic/">NSTIC had lost its way. It's hard to judge totally accurately when lurking on the webcast from Sydney (at 4:00am) but the last plenary seemed pedestrian to me. And I'm afraid to say that some NSTIC committees have got a little testy. But today's NSTIC session here was a turning point. Not only are there a number or truly exciting pilots showing real progress, but Jeremy Grant has credible plans for improving accountability and momentum, and the new technology lead Paul Grassi is thinking outside the box and speaking out of school. The whole program seems fresh all over again.

In a packed presentation, Grassi impressed me enormously on a number of points:

  • Firstly, he advocates a pragmatic NSTIC-focused extension of the old US government Authentication Guide NIST SP 800-63. Rather than a formal revision, a companion document might be most realistic. Along the way, Grassi really nailed an issue which we identity professionals need to talk about more: language. He said that there are words in 800-63 that are "never used anywhere else in systems development". No wonder, as he says, it's still "hard to implement identity"!
  • Incidentally I chatted some more with Andrew Hughes about language; he is passionate about terms, and highlights that our term "Relying Party" is an especially terrible distraction for Service Providers whose reason-for-being has nothing to do with "relying" on anyone!
  • Secondly, Paul Grassi wants to "get very aggressive on attributes", including emphasis on practical measurement (since that's really what NIST is all about). I don't think I need to say anything more about that than Bravo!
  • And thirdly, Grassi asked "What if we got rid of LOAs?!". This kind of iconoclastic thinking is overdue, and was floated as part of a broad push to revamp the way government's orthodox thinking on Identity Assurance is translated to the business world. Grassi and Grant don't say LOAs can or should be abandoned by government, but they do see that shoving the rounded business concepts of identity into government's square hole has not done anyone much credit.

Just one small part of NSTIC annoyed me today: the persistent idea that federation hubs are inherently simpler than one-to-one authentication. They showed the following classic sort of 'before and after' shots, where it seems self-evident that a hub (here the Federal Cloud Credential Exchange FCCX) reduces complexity. The reality is that multilateral brokered arrangements between RPs and IdPs are far more complex than simple bilateral direct contracts. And moreover, the new forms of agreements are novel and untested in real world business. The time and cost and unpredictability of working out these new arrangements is not properly accounted for and has often been fatal to identity federations.

IMG 5412 BEFORE cropped
IMG 5413 AFTER cropped


The dog barks and this time the caravan turns around

One of the top talking points at #CISmcc has of course been FIDO. The FIDO Alliance goes from strength to strength; we heard they have over 130 members now (remember it started with four or five less than 18 months ago). On Saturday afternoon there was a packed-out FIDO show case with six vendors showing real FIDO-ready products. And today there was a three hour deep dive into the two flagship FIDO protocols UAF (which enables better sharing of strong authentication signals such that passwords may be eliminated) to and U2F (which standardises and strengthens Two Factor Authentication).

FIDO's marketing messages are improving all the time, thanks to a special focus on strategic marketing which was given its own working group. In particular, the Alliance is steadily clarifying the distinction between identity and authentication, and sticking adamantly to the latter. In other words, FIDO is really all about the attributes. FIDO leaves identity as a problem to be addressed further up the stack, and dedicates itself to strengthening the authentication signal sent from end-point devices to servers.

The protocol tutorials were excellent, going into detail about how "Attestation Certificates" are used to convey the qualities and attributes of authentication hardware (such as device model, biometric modality, security certifications, elapsed time since last user verification etc) thus enabling nice fine-grained policy enforcement on the RP side. To my mind, UAF and U2F show how nature intended PKI to have been used all along!

Some confusion remains as to why FIDO has two protocols. I heard some quiet calls for UAF and U2F to converge, yet that would seem to put the elegance of U2F at risk. And it's noteworthy that U2F is being taken beyond the original one time password 2FA, with at least one biometric vendor at the showcase claiming to use it instead of the heavier UAF.

Surprising use cases

Finally, today brought more fresh use cases from cohorts of users we socially privileged identity engineers for the most part rarely think about. Another NSTIC pilot partner is AARP, a membership organization providing "information, advocacy and service" to older people, retirees and other special needs groups. AARP's Jim Barnett gave a compelling presentation on the need to extend from the classic "free" business models of Internet services, to new economically sustainable approaches that properly protect personal information. Barnett stressed that "free" has been great and 'we wouldn't be where we are today without it' but it's just not going to work for health records for example. And identity is central to that.

There's so much more I could report if I had time. But I need to get some sleep before another packed day. All this changing my mind is exhausting.

Cheers again from Monterey.

Posted in Security, Privacy, PKI, Language, Identity, Federated Identity, e-health

Postcard from Monterey #CISmcc

First Day Reflections from CIS Monterey.

Follow along on Twitter at #CISmcc (for the Monterey Conference Centre).

The Cloud Identity Summit really is the top event on the identity calendar. The calibre of the speakers, the relevance and currency of the material, the depth and breadth of the cohort, and the international spread are all unsurpassed. It's been great to meet old cyber-friends in "XYZ Space" at last -- like Emma Lindley from the UK and Lance Peterman. And to catch up with such talented folks like Steffen Sorensen from New Zealand once again.

A day or two before, Ian Glazer of Salesforce asked in a tweet what we were expecting to get out of CIS. And I replied that I hoped to change my mind about something. It's unnerving to have your understanding and assumptions challenged by the best in the field ... OK, sometimes it's outright embarrassing ... but that's what these events are all about. A very wise lawyer said to me once, around 1999 at the dawn of e-commerce, that he had changed his mind about authentication a few times up to that point, and that he fully expected to change his mind again and again.

I spent most of Saturday in Open Identity Foundation workshops. OIDF chair Don Thibeau enthusiastically stressed two new(ish) initiatives: Mobile Connect in conjunction with the mobile carrier trade association GSM Association @GSMA, and HIE Connect for the health sector. For the uninitiated, HIE means Health Information Exchange, namely a hub for sharing structured e-health records among hospitals, doctors, pharmacists, labs, e-health records services, allied health providers, insurers, drug & device companies, researchers and carers; for the initiated, we know there is some language somewhere in which the letters H.I.E. stand for "Not My Lifetime".

But seriously, one of the best (and pleasantly surprising) things about HIE Connect as the OIDF folks tell it, is the way its leaders unflinchingly take for granted the importance of privacy in the exchange of patient health records. Because honestly, privacy is not a given in e-health. There are champions on the new frontiers like genomics that actually say privacy may not be in the interests of the patients (or more's the point, the genomics businesses). And too many engineers in my opinion still struggle with privacy as something they can effect. So it's great -- and believe me, really not obvious -- to hear the HIE Connects folks -- including Debbie Bucci from the US Dept of Health and Human Services, and Justin Richer of Mitre and MIT -- dealing with it head-on. There is a compelling fit for the OAUTH and OIDC protocols here, with their ability to manage discrete pieces of information about users (patients) and to permission them all separately. Having said that, Don and I agree that e-health records permissioning and consent is one of the great UI/UX challenges of our time.

Justin also highlighted that the RESTful patterns emerging for fine-grained permissions management in healthcare are not confined to healthcare. Debbie added that the ability to query rare events without undoing privacy is also going to be a core defining challenge in the Internet of Things.

MyPOV: We may well see tremendous use cases for the fruits of HIE Exchange before they're adopted in healthcare!

In the afternoon, we heard from Canadian and British projects that have been working with the Open Identity Exchange (OIX) program now for a few years each.

Emma Lindley presented the work they've done in the UK Identity Assurance Program (IDAP) with social security entitlements recipients. These are not always the first types of users we think of for sophisticated IDAM functions, but in Britain, local councils see enormous efficiency dividends from speeding up the issuance of eg disabled parking permits, not to mention reducing imposters, which cost money and lead to so much resentment of the well deserved. Emma said one Attributes Exchange beta project reduced the time taken to get a 'Blue Badge' permit from 10 days to 10 minutes. She went on to describe the new "Digital Sources of Trust" initiative which promises to reconnect under-banked and under-documented sections of society with mainstream financial services. Emma told me the much-abused word "transformational" really does apply here.

MyPOV: The Digital Divide is an important issue for me, and I love to see leading edge IDAM technologies and business processes being used to do something about it -- and relatively quickly.

Then Andre Boysen of SecureKey led a discussion of the Canadian identity ecosystem, which he said has stabilised nicely around four players: Federal Government, Provincial Govt, Banks and Carriers. Lots of operations and infrastructure precedents from the payments industry have carried over.
Andre calls the smart driver license of British Columbia the convergence of "street identity and digital identity".

MyPOV: That's great news - and yet comparable jurisdictions like Australia and the USA still struggle to join governments and banks and carriers in an effective identity synthesis without creating great privacy and commercial anxieties. All three cultures are similarly allergic to identity cards, but only in Canada have they managed to supplement drivers licenses with digital identities with relatively high community acceptance. In nearly a decade, Australia has been at a standstill in its national understanding of smartcards and privacy.

For mine, the CIS Quote of the Day came from Scott Rice of the Open ID Foundation. We all know the stark problem in our industry of the under-representation of Relying Parties in the grand federated identity projects. IdPs and carriers so dominate IDAM. Scott asked us to imagine a situation where "The auto industry was driven by steel makers". Governments wouldn't put up with that for long.

Can someone give us the figures? I wonder if Identity and Access Management is already more economically ore important than cars?!

Cheers from Monterey, Day 1.

Posted in Smartcards, Security, Identity, Federated Identity, e-health, Cloud, Biometrics, Big Data

FIDO Alliance goes from strength to strength

With a bunch of exciting new members joining up on the eve of the RSA Conference, the FIDO Alliance is going from strength to strength. And they've just published the first public review drafts of their core "universal authentication" protocols.

An update to my Constellation Research report on FIDO is now available. Here's a preview.

The Go-To standards alliance in protocols for modern identity management

The FIDO Alliance – for Fast IDentity Online – is a fresh, fast growing consortium of security vendors and end users working out a new suite of protocols and standards to connect authentication endpoints to services. With an unusual degree of clarity in this field, FIDO envisages simply "doing for authentication what Ethernet did for networking".

Launched in early 2013, the FIDO Alliance has already grown to nearly 100 members, amongst which are heavyweights like Google, Lenovo, MasterCard, Microsoft and PayPal as well as a couple of dozen biometrics vendors, many of the leading Identity and Access Management solutions and service providers and several global players in the smartcard supply chain.

FIDO is different. The typical hackneyed elevator pitch in Identity and Access Management promises to "fix the password crisis" – usually by changing the way business is done. Most IDAM initiatives unwittingly convert clear-cut technology problems into open-ended business transformation problems. In contrast, FIDO's mission is refreshingly clear cut: it seeks to make strong authentication interoperable between devices and servers. When users have activated FIDO-compliant endpoints, reliable fine-grained information about their client environment becomes readily discoverable by any servers, which can then make access control decisions, each according to its own security policy.

With its focus, pragmatism and critical mass, FIDO is justifiably today's go-to authentication standards effort.

In February 2014, the FIDO Alliance announced the release of its first two protocol drafts, and a clutch of new members including powerful players in financial services, the cloud and e-commerce. Constellation notes in particular the addition to the board of security leader RSA and another major payments card, Discover. And FIDO continues to strengthen its vital “Relying Party” (service provider) representation with the appearance of Aetna, Goldman Sachs, Netflix and Salesforce.com.

It's time we fixed the Authentication plumbing

In my view, the best thing about FIDO is that it is not about federated identity but instead it operates one layer down in what we call the digital identity stack. This might seem to run against the IDAM tide, but it's refreshing, and it may help the FIDO Alliance sidestep the quagmire of identity policy mapping and legal complexities. FIDO is not really about the vexed general issue of "identity" at all! Instead, it's about low level authentication protocols; that is, the plumbing.

The FIDO Alliance sets out its mission as follows:

  • Change the nature of online authentication by:
    • Developing technical specifications that define an open, scalable, interoperable set of mechanisms that reduce the reliance on passwords to authenticate users.
    • Operating industry programs to help ensure successful worldwide adoption of the Specifications.
    • Submitting mature technical Specification(s) to recognized standards development organization(s) for formal standardization.

The engineering problem underlying Federated Identity is actually pretty simple: if we want to have a choice of high-grade physical, multi-factor "keys" used to access remote services, how do we convey reliable cues to those services about the type of key being used and the individual who's said to be using it? If we can solve that problem, then service providers and Relying Parties can sort out for themselves precisely what they need to know about the users, sufficient to identify and authenticate them.

All of these leaves the 'I' in the acronym "FIDO" a little contradictory. It's such a cute name (alluding of course to the Internet dog) that it's unlikely to change. Instead, I overheard that the acronym might go the way of "KFC" where eventually it is no longer spelled out and just becomes a word in and of itself.

FIDO Alliance Board Members

  • Blackberry
  • CrucialTec (manufactures innovative user input devices for mobiles)
  • Discover Card
  • Google
  • Lenovo
  • MasterCard
  • Microsoft
  • Nok Nok Labs (a specialist authentication server software company)
  • NXP Semiconductors (a global supplier of card chips, SIMs and Secure Elements)
  • Oberthur Technologies (a multinational smartcard and mobility solutions provider)
  • PayPal
  • RSA
  • Synaptics (fingerprint biometrics)
  • Yubico (the developer of the YubiKey PKI enabled 2FA token).

FIDO Alliance Board Sponsor Level Members

  • Aetna
  • ARM
  • AGNITiO
  • Dell
  • Discretix
  • Entersekt
  • EyeLock Inc.
  • Fingerprint Cards AB
  • FingerQ
  • Goldman Sachs
  • IdentityX
  • IDEX ASA
  • Infineon
  • Kili
  • Netflix
  • Next Biometrics Group
  • Oesterreichische Staatsdruckerei GmbH
  • Ping Identity
  • SafeNet
  • Salesforce
  • SecureKey
  • Sonavation
  • STMicroelectronics
  • Wave Systems

Stay tuned for the updated Constellation Research report.

Posted in Smartcards, Security, Identity, Federated Identity, Constellation Research, Biometrics

The Snapchat data breach

Yesterday it was reported by The Verge that anonymous hackers have accessed Snapchat's user database and posted 4.6 million user names and phone numbers. In an apparent effort to soften the blow, two digits of the phone numbers were redacted. So we might assume this is a "white hat" exercise, designed to shame Snapchat into improving their security. Indeed, a few days ago Snapchat themselves said they had been warned of vulnerabilities in their APIs that would allow a mass upload of user records.

The response of many has been, well, so what? Some people have casually likened Snapchat's list to a public White Pages; others have played it down as "just email addresses".

Let's look more closely. The leaked list was not in fact public names and phone numbers; it was user names and phone numbers. User names might often be email addresses but these are typically aliases; people frequently choose email addresses that reveal little or nothing of their real world identity. We should assume there is intent in an obscure email address for the individual to remain secret.

Identity theft has become a highly organised criminal enterprise. Crime gangs patiently acquire multiple data sets over many months, sometimes years, gradually piecing together detailed personal profiles. It's been shown time and time again by privacy researchers (perhaps most notably Latanya Sweeney) that re-identification is enabled by linking diverse data sets. And for this purpose, email addresses and phone numbers are superbly valuable indices for correlating an individual's various records. Your email address is common across most of your social media registrations. And your phone number allows your real name and street address to be looked up from reverse White Pages. So the Snapchat breach could be used to join aliases or email addresses to real names and addresses via the phone numbers. For a social engineering attack on a call centre -- or even to open a new bank account -- an identity thief can go an awful long way with real name, street address, email address and phone number.

I was asked in an interview to compare the theft of stolen phone numbers with social security numbers. I surprised the interviewer when I said phone numbers are probably even more valuable to the highly organised ID thief, for they can be used to index names in public directories, and to link different data sets, in ways that SSNs (or credit card numbers for that matter) cannot.

So let us start to treat all personal inormation -- especially when aggregated in bulk -- more seriously! And let's be more cautious in the way we categorise personal or Personally Identifiable Information (PII).

Importantly, most regulatory definitions of PII already embody the proper degree of caution. Look carefully at the US government definition of Personally Identifiable Information:

  • information that can be used to distinguish or trace an individual’s identity, either alone or when combined with other personal or identifying information that is linked or linkable to a specific individual (underline added).

This means that items of data can constitute PII if other data can be combined to identify the person concerned. That is, the fragments are regarded as PII even if it is the whole that does the identifying.

And remember that the middle I in PII stands for Identifiable, and not, as many people presume, Identifying. To meet the definition of PII, data need not uniquely identify a person, it merely needs to be directly or indirectly identifiable with a person. And this is how it should be when we heed the way information technologies enable identification through linkages.

Almost anywhere else in the world, data stores like Snapchat's would automatically fall under data protection and information privacy laws; regulators would take a close look at whether the company had complied with the OECD Privacy Principles, and whether Snapchat's security measures were fit for purpose given the PII concerned. But in the USA, companies and commentators alike still have trouble working out how serious these breaches are. Each new breach is treated in an ad hoc manner, often with people finessing the difference between credit card numbers -- as in the recent Target breach -- and "mere" email addresses like those in the Snapchat and Epsilon episodes.

Surely the time has come to simply give proper regulatory protection to all PII.

Posted in Social Networking, Social Media, Security, Privacy, Identity, Fraud, Big Data

My analysis of the FIDO Alliance

I've written a new Constellation Research "Quark" Report on the FIDO Alliance ("Fast Identity Online"), a fresh, fast growing consortium working out protocols and standards to connect authentication endpoints to services.

With a degree of clarity that is uncommon in Identity and Access Management (IDAM), FIDO envisages simply "doing for authentication what Ethernet did for networking".

Not quite one year old, 2013, the FIDO Alliance has already grown to nearly 70 members, amongst which are heavyweights like Google, Lenovo, MasterCard, Microsoft and PayPal as well as a dozen biometrics vendors and several global players in the smartcard supply chain.

STOP PRESS! Discover Card joined a few days ago at board level.

FIDO is different. The typical hackneyed IDAM elevator pitch in promises to "fix the password crisis" but usually with unintended impacts on how business is done. Most IDAM initiatives unwittingly convert clear-cut technology problems into open-ended business transformation problems.

In welcome contrast, FIDO’s mission is clear cut: it seeks to make strong authentication interoperable between devices and servers. When users have activated FIDO-compliant endpoints, reliable fine-grained information about the state of authentication becomes readily discoverable by any server, which can then make access control decisions according to its own security policy.

FIDO is not about federation; it's not even about "identity"!

With its focus, pragmatism and critical mass, FIDO is justifiably today’s go-to authentication industry standards effort.

For more detail, please have a look at The FIDO Alliance at the Constellation Research website.

Posted in Smartcards, Security, Identity, Biometrics

Attribute wallets

There's little debate now that attributes are at least as important as "identity" in making decisions about authorization online. This was a recurring theme at the recent Cloud Identity Summit and in subsequent discussions on Twitter, my blog site and Kuppinger Cole's. The attention to attributes might mean a return to basics, with a focus on what it is we really need to know about each other in business. It takes me back to the old APEC definition of authentication: the means by which the recipient of a transaction or message can make an assessment as to whether to accept or reject that transaction.

A few questions remain, like what is the best way for attributes to be made available? And where does all this leave the IdP? The default architecture in many peoples' minds is that attributes should be served up online by Attribute Providers in response to Relying Party's needing to know things about Subjects instantaneously. The various real time negotiations are threaded together by one or more Identity Providers. Here I want to present an alternative but complementary vision, in which attributes are presented to Relying Parties out of digital wallets controlled by the Subjects concerned, and with little or no involvement of Identity Providers as such.

Terminology: In this post and in most of my works I use the nouns attribute, claim and [identity] assertion interchangeably. What we're talking about are specific factoids about the first party to a transaction (the "Subject") that are interesting to the second party in the transaction (the "Relying Party" or Service Provider). In general, each attribute is vouched for by an authoritative third party referred to as an Attribute Provider. In some special cases, an RP can trust the Subject to assert certain things about themselves, but the more interesting general case is where the Relying Party needs external assurance that a given attribute is true for the Subject in question. I don't have much to say about self-asserted attributes.

The need to know

As much as we're all interested in identity and "trust" online, the currency of most transactions is context-specific attributes. The context of a transaction often determines (and determines completely) the attributes that determine whether a party is authorised. For example, if the Subject is a shopper, the RP a merchant and the transaction a credit card purchase, then the attributes of interest are the cardholder name, account number, billing address and maybe the card verification code. In the context of dispensing an electronic prescription, the only attribute might be the doctor's prescriber number (pharmacists of course don't care who the doctor 'really is'; notoriously they can't even read the doctor's handwriting). For authorising a purchase order on behalf of a company, the important attributes might be the employee position and staff ID. For opening a new bank account, Know-Your-Customer (KYC) rules in most jurisdictions will dictate that such attributes as legal name, address, date of birth and so on be presented in a prescribed form (typically by way of original government issued ID documents).

For most of the common attributes of interest in routine business, there are natural recognised Attribute Authorities. Some are literally authoritative over particular attributes. Professional bodies for instance issue registration numbers to accountants, doctors, engineers and so on; employees assign staff IDs; banks issue credit card numbers. In other cases, there are de facto authorities; most famously, driver licenses are relied on almost universally as proof of age around the world.

Sometimes rules are laid down that designate certain organisations to act as Attribute Providers - without necessarily using that term. Consider how KYC rules in effect designate Attribute Authorities. In Australia, the Financial Transaction Reports Act 1988 (FTRA) has long established an identity verification procedure called the "100 point check". FTRA regulations prescribe a number of points to various identification documents, and in order to open a bank account here, you need to present a total of 100 points worth of documents. Notable documents include:

  • Birth certificate: 70 points
  • Current passport: 70 points
  • Australian driver licence [bearing a photo]: 40 points
  • Foreign driver licence [not necessarily bearing a photo]: 25 points
  • Credit card: 25 points.

So in effect, the financial regulators in Australia have designated driver license bureaus and credit card issuers to be Attribute Providers for names (again, without actually using the label "AP"). Under legislated KYC rules, a bank creating a new customer account can rely on assertions made by other banks or even foreign driver license authorities about the customer's name, without needing to have any relationship with the "APs". Crucially, the bank need not investigate for itself nor understand the detailed identification processes of the "APs" listed in the KYC rules. Of course we can presume that KYC legislators took advice on the details of how various identity documents are put together, and in the event that an error is found somewhere in the production of an identity feeder document then forensic investigation would follow, but the important point is that routinely, the inner workings of all the various APs are opaque to most relying parties. The bank as RP does not need to know how a license bureau does its job.

And yet we do know that the recognised Attribute Providers continuously improve what they do. Consider driver licenses. In Australia up until the 1970s, driver licenses were issued on paper. Then plastic cards were introduced with photographs. Numerous anti-copying measures have been rolled out since then, such as holograms, and guilloche, optically variable and micro printing. Now the first chipped driver licenses are being issued, in which cryptographic technology not only makes counterfeiting difficult but also enables digitally signed cardholder details to be transmitted electronically (the same trick utilised in EMV to stop skimming and carding). Less obvious to users, biometric facial recognition is also used now during issuance and renewal to detect fraudsters. So over time the attributes conveyed by driver licenses have not changed at all - name, address and date of birth have always meant the same thing - but the reliability of these attributes when presented via licenses is better than ever.

Imposters are better detected during the issuance process, the medium has become steadily more secure, and, more subtly, the binding between each licence and its legitimate holder is stronger.

We are accustomed in traditional business to dealing with others on the basis of their official credentials alone, without needing to know much about who they 'really are'. When deciding if we can accept someone in a particular transaction context, we rely on recognised providers of relevant attributes. Hotel security checks a driver license for a patron's age; householders check the official ID badges of repair people and meter readers; a pathologist checks the medical credentials of an ordering doctor; an architect only deals with licensed surveyors and structural engineers; shareholders only need to know that a company's auditors are properly certified accountants. In none of these routine cases is the personal identity of the first party of any real interest. What matters is the attributes that authorise them to deal in each context.

Digital wallets

Now, in the online environment, what is the best way to access attributes? My vision is of digital wallets. I advocate that users be equipped to hold close any number of recognised attributes in machine readable formats, so they can present selected attributes as the need arises, directly to Relying Parties. This sort of approach is enabled by the fact that the majority of economically important transaction settings draw on a relatively small number of attributes, and we can define a useful attribute superset in advance. As discussed previously such a superset could include:

  • {Given name, Residential address, Postal address, Date of Birth, "Over 18", Residential status, Professional qualification(s), Association Membership(s), Social security number, Student number, Employee Number, Bank account number(s), Credit card number(s), Customer Reference Number(s), Medicare Number, Health Insurance No., Health Identifier(s), OSN Membership(s)}

Many of these attributes have just one natural authoritative provider each; others could be provided by a number of alternative organisations that happen to verify them as a matter of course and could stand ready to vouch for them. The decision to accept any AP's word for a given attribute is ultimately up to the Relying Party; each RP has its own standards for the required bona fides of the attributes it cares about.

There are a few obvious candidates for digital attribute wallets:


  • A smart phone could come pre-loaded with attributes that have been verified as a matter of course by the telephone company, like the credit card number associated with the account, or proof of age. A digital wallet on the phone could later be topped up with additional attributes, over the air or via some other more secure over-the-counter protocol.

  • A smart driver license could hold digital certificates signed by the licensing bureau, asserting name, address, date of birth, and/or simpler de-identified statements like "the older is over 18". Note that the assertions could be made separately or in useful combinations; for privacy, a proof of age certificate need not name the holder but simply specify that the assertion is carried on a particular type of chip, signed by the authoritative issuer.

  • When you receive a smart bank card, the issuer bank could load the chip with your name, address, date of birth, PANs and/or certified copies of identity documents presented to open the account. Such personal identity assertions could then be presented by the customer to other RPs like financial institutions or retailers to originate other accounts.

Do we need an "Identity Provider" to thread together these attributes? No. While it is important that RPs can trust that each attribute is in the right hands, the issuance process (including the provisioning of attribute carrying tokens like cards and mobile phones) is just one aspect of the Attribute Provider's job. If we can trust say a licensing bureau to verify the particulars of a license holder, then we can also trust them as part of that process to ensure that the license is in the hands of its rightful owner.

In contrast with the real time 'negotiated' attributes exchange architectures, the digital wallet approach has the following advantages:


  • Decentralised architecture: lower cost and quicker to deploy; we can start local and scale up as Attribute Providers gain ground;

  • Fast: digitally signed attributes presented from smart devices diret to Relying Parties can be cryptographically verified instantaneously, for higher performance, especially in bandwidth limited environments.

  • Intrinsically private: Direct presentation of attributes minimises the exposure of personal information to third parties.

  • ”Natural”: Digital wallets of attributes is congruent with the way we hold diverse pieces of personal documentation in regular wallets; unlike big federation model, no novel new intermediaries are involved.

  • Legally simpler: It is relatively simple matter for Attribute Authorities to warrant the accuracy of separate particulars like name, date of birth, account number, without any making any other broad representations of who the Subject 'really is'. There is none of the legal fine print that bedevilled Big PKI Certification Authorities in the past and which proved fatal in federation programs like the Internet Industry Association 2FA pilot.

Notes

  • On a case by case basis, as dictated by their risk management strategies, RPs can revert to an online AP to check the up-to-the-minute validity of an attribute. In practice this is not necessary in many cases; many of the common attributes in business are static, and once issued (or vouched for by a reputable body) do not change. If attributes are conveyed by digital certificates, then their validity can be efficiently checked online by OCSP and near-line by CRL.
  • The patient smartcards already widespread in Europe are an ideal carrier for a plurality of human services identifiers (such as public health insurance numbers, health record identifiers, medical social networking handles, and research tracking numbers; see also a previous presentation on anonymity and pseudonymity in e-research).
  • As other conventional plastic cards are progressively upgraded to chip - such as the proposed US Medicare card modernization - we have a natural opportunity to load them with secure digital assertions too.
  • In the medium to long term, digitally signed attributes could be made to chain through communities of CAs to a small number of globally recognised Root Authorities. For a model, refer to s4.4 "How to convey fitness for purpose" of my Public Key Superstructure presentation to the 2008 NIST IDTrust workshop.

Posted in Smartcards, Security, Identity, Federated Identity, Trust

Metaphormosis

We can over-stretch our metaphors.

Is a passport an "identifier"?
Is a drivers licence an identifier?
Is a credit card an identifier?
Is a professional membership card an identifier?
Is an employee badge an identifier?
Is a building access card an identifier?
Is a house key an identifier?
Is a car key an identifier?

Or putting the questions another way ...

Is a car key a "key"?
Is a house key a key?
Is a building access card a key?
Is an employee badge a key?
Is a professional membership card a key [to access an association]?
Is a credit card a key [to a payments system]?
Is a drivers licence a key [to access the privileges of road usage]?
Is a passport a key [to enter another country]?

From When does a key become an identifier?, 28 April 2005.

Posted in Security, Language, Identity

The IdP is Dead!

"All Hail the Relyingpartyrati!"

I presented my ecological theory of identity to the Cloud Identity Summit last week.

The quote "The IdP is Dead! Hail the Relyingpartyrati" is from my conclusion (reflecting the running inside joke at CIS that something has to die each year). One of my ideas is that because identification is carried out by Relying Parties, it's more correct (and probably liberating) to think of identity as being created by the RP. The best option for what we call "Identity Providers" today may be to switch to providing more specific Attributes or identity assertions. In fact, the importance of attributes kept recurring throughout CIS; Andrew Nash for example said at one point that "attributes are at least as interesting if not more so than identities".

[Now it has emerged during the debates that people might use the word "attribute" in slightly different ways. I said at CIS that I treat 'attributes', 'assertions' and 'claims' interchangeably; I think we should focus functionally on reliable exchange of whatever factoids a Relying Party needs to know about a Subject in order to be able to transact. I'll blog in more detail about Attributes shortly.]

To summarise my CIS talk:

Federated Identity is easier said than done. In response, we should drop down a level, and instead of trading in abstract high level identities, let's instead federate concrete component attributes. We don't really need Identity Providers as such; we need a marketplace of Attribute Providers from which Relying Parties can get exactly the right information they need to identify their users.


  • identities evolve over time in response to risk factors in the natural business environment; we need to understand why authentication has got the way it is before we rush in to federate disparate methods
  • identities appear to be "memetic", composed of heritable traits relating to business rules and practices, conventions, standards, regulations, technologies, algorithms, cryptographic parameters, form factors and so on
  • the dreaded identity silos are actually ecological niches; taking an identity from the context in which it evolved and using it in another is like taking a salt water fish and dropping it into a fresh water tank
  • if identity is memetic then we should be able to sequence digital identities into their constituent memes, and thence re-engineer them more carefully to match desired new applications
  • it is an over-simplification to think of a (one dimensional) identity spectrum; instead each RP's "identification" requirements are multi-dimensional, and best visualised as a surface.

Posted in Identity, Federated Identity, Cloud