Lockstep

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Email: swilson@lockstep.com.au

Does government have the innovation appetite?

Under new Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, innovation for once is the policy du jour in Australia. Innovation is associated with risk taking, but too often, government wants others to take the risk. It wants venture capitalists to take investment risk, and start-ups to take R&D risks. Is it time now for government to walk the talk?

State and federal agencies remain the most important buyers of IT in Australia. To stimulate domestic R&D and advance an innovation culture, governments should be taking some bold procurement risk, punting to some degree on new technology. Major projects like driver licence technology upgrades, the erstwhile Human Services Access Card, the national broadband roll-out, and national e-health systems, would be ideal environments in which to preferentially select next generation, home-grown products.

Obviously government must be prudent spending public money on new technology. Yet at the same time, there is a public interest argument for selecting newer solutions: in the rapidly changing online environment, citizens stand to benefit from the latest innovations, bred in response to current challenges.

What do entrepreneurs need most to help them innovate and prosper? It's metaphorical oxygen!

Innovators need:

  • access to prospective customers, so we may showcase disruptive technologies
  • procurement processes that admit, nay encourage, some technology risk taking
  • agile tender specifications that call for the unexpected in responses, prompting disruptive technologies
  • open-mindedness from big prime contractors, who too often are deaf to inventive SMEs
  • curiosity for innovation amongst business people
  • optimism amongst buyers that small local players might have something special to offer
  • and a reversal of the classic Australian taboo against sales.

    Too often, innovative entrepreneurs are met with the admonition you’re only trying to sell us something. Well yes we are, but it's because we believe we have something to meet real needs, and that customers actually need to buy something.

    Posted in Innovation, Government

  • An identity glut on the Internet of Things

    The identerati sometimes refer to the challenge of “binding carbon to silicon”. That’s a poetic way of describing how the field of Identity and Access Management (IDAM) is concerned with associating carbon-based life forms (as geeks fondly refer to people) with computers (or silicon chips).

    To securely bind users’ identities or attributes to their computerised activities is indeed a technical challenge. In most conventional IDAM systems, there is only circumstantial evidence of who did what and when, in the form of access logs and audit trails, most of which can be tampered with or counterfeited by a sufficiently determined fraudster. To create a lasting, tamper-resistant impression of what people do online requires some sophisticated technology (in particular, digital signatures created using hardware-based cryptography).

    On the other hand, working out looser associations between people and computers is the stock-in-trade of social networking operators and Big Data analysts. So many signals are emitted as a side effect of routine information processing today that even the shyest of users may be uncovered by third parties with sufficient analytics know-how and access to data.

    So privacy is in peril. For the past two years, big data breaches have only got bigger: witness the losses at Target (110 million), EBay (145 million), Home Depot (109 million records) and JPMorgan Chase (83 million) to name a few. Breaches have got deeper, too. Most notably, in June 2015 the U.S. federal government’s Office of Personnel Management (OPM) revealed it had been hacked, with the loss of detailed background profiles on 15 million past and present employees.

    I see a terrible systemic weakness in the standard practice of information security. Look at the OPM breach: what was going on that led to application forms for employees dating back 15 years remaining in a database accessible from the Internet? What was the real need for this availability? Instead of relying on firewalls and access policies to protect valuable data from attack, enterprises need to review which data needs to be online at all.

    We urgently need to reduce the exposed attack surface of our information assets. But in the information age, the default has become to make data as available as possible. This liberality is driven both by the convenience of having all possible data on hand, just in case in it might be handy one day, and by the plummeting cost of mass storage. But it's also the result of a technocratic culture that knows "knowledge is power," and gorges on data.

    In communications theory, Metcalfe’s Law states that the value of a network is proportional to the square of the number of devices that are connected. This is an objective mathematical reality, but technocrats have transformed it into a moral imperative. Many think it axiomatic that good things come automatically from inter-connection and information sharing; that is, the more connection the better. Openness is an unexamined rallying call for both technology and society. “Publicness” advocate Jeff Jarvis wrote (admittedly provocatively) that: “The more public society is, the safer it is”. And so a sort of forced promiscuity is shaping up as the norm on the Internet of Things. We can call it "superconnectivity", with a nod to the special state of matter where electrical resistance drops to zero.

    In thinking about privacy on the IoT, a key question is this: how much of the data emitted from Internet-enabled devices will actually be personal data? If great care is not taken in the design of these systems, the unfortunate answer will be most of it.

    Steve Wilson CISID15 Rationing Identity in IoT (0 4) HANDOUTS  Data flows in Internet of Cars
    Steve Wilson CISID15 Rationing Identity in IoT (0 4 1) HANDOUTS  Imposing order IoT PII flows

    My latest investigation into IoT privacy uses the example of the Internet connected motor car. "Rationing Identity on the Internet of Things" will be released soon by Constellation Research.

    And don't forget Constellation's annual innovation summit, Connected Enterprise at Half Moon Bay outside San Francisco, November 4th-6th. Early bird registration closes soon.

    Posted in Security, Privacy, Cloud, Big Data

    On certain criticism of Frank Gehry

    A letter to the editor, Sydney Morning Herald, January 14, 2011.

    The ABC screened a nice documentary last night, "Getting Frank Gehry", about the new UTS Business School building. The only thing spoiling the show was Sydney's rusted-on architecture critic Elizabeth Farrelly having another self-conscious whinge. And I remembered that I wrote a letter to the Herald after she had a go in 2011 when the design was unveiled (see "Gehry has designed a building that is more about him than us").

    Where would damp squib critics be without the 'starchitects' they love to hate?

    Letter as published

    Ironically, Elizabeth Farrelly's diatribe against Frank Gehry and his UTS design is really all about her. She spends 12 flabby paragraphs defending criticism (please! Aren't Australians OK by now with the idea of critics?) and bravely mocking Gehry as "starchitect".

    Eventually Farrelly lets go her best shots: mild rhetorical questions about the proposal's still unseen interior, daft literalism about buildings being unable to move, and a "quibble" about harmony. I guess she likewise dismisses Gaudi and his famous fluid masonry.

    Farrelly's contempt for the university's ''boot licking'' engagement with this celebrated architect is simply myopic. The thing about geniuses like Gehry and Utzon is that brave clients can trust that the results will prevail.

    Stephen Wilson, Five Dock

    Posted in Culture

    Biometrics Privacy Trust Mark Development - Stage 2

    The Biometrics Institute has received Australian government assistance to fund the next stage of the development of a new privacy Trust Mark. And Lockstep Consulting is again working with the Institute to bring this privacy initiative to fruition.

    A detailed feasibility study was undertaken by Lockstep in the first half of 2015, involving numerous privacy advocates, regulators and vendors in Europe, the US, New Zealand and Australia.

    We found strong demand for a reputable, non-trivial B2C biometrics certification.

    Privacy advocates are generally supportive of a new Trust Mark, however they stress that a Trust Mark can be counter-productive if it is too easy to obtain, biased by industry interests, and/or poorly policed. There is general agreement that a credible trust mark should be non-trivial, and consequently, that the criteria be reasonably prescriptive. The reality of a strong Trust Mark is that not all architectures and solution instances will be compatible with the certification criteria.

    The next stage of the Biometrics Institute project will deliver technical criteria for the award of the Trust Mark, and a PIA (Privacy Impact Assessment) template. A condition of the Trust Mark will be that a PIA is undertaken.

    Please contact Steve Wilson at Lockstep swilson@lockstep.com.au or Isabelle Moeller (Biometrics Institute CEO) isabelle@biometricsinstitute.org, if you'd like to receive further details of the Stage 1 findings, or would like to contribute to the technical research in Stage 2.

    Posted in Trust, Privacy, Biometrics

    A letter on Free Speech and the Right to be Forgotten

    An unpublished letter to New Yorker magazine, August 2015.

    Kelefa Sanneh ("The Hell You Say", Aug 10 & 17) poses a question close to the heart of society’s analog-to-digital conversion: What is speech?

    Internet policy makers worldwide are struggling with a recent European Court of Justice decision which grants some rights to individuals to have search engines like Google block results that are inaccurate, irrelevant or out of date. Colloquially known as the "Right To Be Forgotten" (RTBF), the ruling has raised the ire of many Americans in particular, who typically frame it as yet another attack on free speech. Better defined as a right to be de-listed, RTBF makes search providers consider the impact on individuals of search algorithms, alongside their commercial interests. For there should be no doubt – search is very big business. Google and its competitors use search to get to know people, so they can sell better advertising.

    Search results are categorically not the sort of text which contributes to "democratic deliberation". Free speech may be many things but surely not the mechanical by-products of advertising processes. To protect search results as such mocks the First Amendment.

    End.

    Some of my other RTBF thoughts:

    Posted in Privacy, Internet, Culture, Big Data

    Good, better, BlackBerry

    In the latest course of a 15 month security feast, BlackBerry has announced it is acquiring mobile device management (MDM) provider Good Technology. The deal is said to be definitive, for US$425 million in cash.

    As BlackBerry boldly re-positions itself as a managed service play in the Internet of Things, adding an established MDM capability to its portfolio will bolster its claim -- which still surprises many -- to be handset neutral. But the Good buy is much more than that. It has to be seen in the context of John Chen's drive for cross-sector security and privacy infrastructure for the IoT.

    As I reported from the recent BlackBerry Security Summit in New York, the company has knitted together a comprehensive IoT security fabric. Look at how they paint their security platform:

    BBY Security Platform In Action

    And see how Good will slip neatly into the Platform Services column. It's the latest in what is now a $575 million investment in non-organic security growth (following purchases of Secusmart, Watchdox, Movirtu and Athoc).

    According to BlackBerry,

      • Good will bring complementary capabilities and technologies to BlackBerry, including secure applications and containerization that protects end user privacy. With Good, BlackBerry will expand its ability to offer cross-platform EMM solutions that are critical in a world with varying deployment models such as bring-your-own-device (BYOD); corporate owned, personally enabled (COPE); as well as environments with multiple user interfaces and operating systems. Good has expertise in multi-OS management with 64 percent of activations from iOS devices, followed by a broad Android and Windows customer base.(1) This experience combined with BlackBerry’s strength in BlackBerry 10 and Android management – including Samsung KNOX-enabled devices – will provide customers with increased choice for securely deploying any leading operating system in their organization.

    MyPOV

    The strategic acquisition of Good Technology will also give the Identity-as-a-Service sector a big kick. IDaaS is become a crowded space with at least ten vendors (CA, Centrify, IBM, Microsoft, Okta, OneLogin, Ping, Salepoint, Salesforce, VMware) competing strongly around a pretty well settled set of features and functions. BlackBerry themselves launched an IDaaS a few months ago. At the Security Summit, I asked their COO Marty Beard what is going to distinguishe their offering in such a tight market, and he said, simply, mobility. Presto!

    But IDaaS is set to pivot. We all know that mobility is now the locus of security , and we've seen VMware parlay its AirWatch investment into a competitive new cloud identity service. This must be more than a catch-up play with so many entrenched IDaaS vendors.

    Here's the thing. I foresee identity actually disappearing from the user experience, which more and more will just be about the apps. I discussed this development in a really fun "Identity Innovators" video interview recorded with Ping at the recent Cloud Identity Summit. For identity to become seamless with the mobile application UX, we need two things. Firstly, federation protocols so that different pieces of software can hand over attributes and authentication signals to one another, and these are all in place now. But secondly we also need fully automated mobile device management as a service, and that's where Good truly fits with the growing BlackBerry platform.

    Now stay tuned for new research coming soon via Constellation on the Internet of Things, identity, privacy and software reliability.

    See also The State of Identity Management in 2015.

    Posted in Security, Identity, Federated Identity, Constellation Research, Big Data